Photos / Sounds

What

Bolander's Monkeyflower Diplacus bolanderi

Observer

natureali

Date

June 3, 2016 10:05 AM PDT

Photos / Sounds

Square

Date

June 19, 2016 12:02 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Fairy Mist Pterostegia drymarioides

Observer

leptonia

Date

May 13, 2016 10:14 AM PDT

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Fairy Mist Pterostegia drymarioides

Date

April 29, 2016 11:44 AM PDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Delaware Skipper Anatrytone logan

Observer

aguilita

Date

May 6, 2016

Description

Orange Skipperling (Copaeodes aurantiaca) - female

6 May 2016
Clear Creek Natural Heritage Center
Denton, Denton County, Texas

Note: With special thanks to Dr. John S. Ascher, Contributing Editor, and Bob Biagi, Contributor, BugGuide, Department of Entomology, Iowa State University, for their prompt and accurate assistance in confirming both the ID of this grass skipper and its sex. To access the ID on BugGuide, go to: http://bugguide.net/node/view/1220621

* This is the first iNat record of Orange Skipperling for Denton County, Texas: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?place_id=1862&taxon_id=129415

Our observation found Orange Skipperling (female) nectaring on Common Vetch. Orange Skipperling is found in six southwestern states within the United States including (in alphabetical order): Arizona, California, Oklahoma, Nevada, New Mexico, and Texas. Its range extends from its indicated US range south through Mexico and on into Central America all the way to Panama. It apparently does not extend its range into South America. With respect to its taxonomy, The Butterflies of the World Foundation states: "The family Hesperiidae includes all butterflies that are collectively called skippers because of their fast skipping flight. This family is the sole member of the Superfamily Hesperioidea. Whereas, the other five families of butterflies belong to the Superfamily Papilionoidea. So, skippers are considered butterflies, but they have a few traits different than the species of “True” butterflies found in the Superfamily Papilionoidea. Some of these traits include large eyes, short antennae (often with hooked clubs) and stout bodies. Most also have a very rapid flight with a fast, almost blurred, wing beat. There are about 3,500 species of skippers and they’re further divided into seven subfamilies. They occur worldwide with more found in the tropics. Most species are brown or tan, but some tropical members can be quite colorful." Because of its presence in North and Central America, Orange Skipperling is an authentic resident of the Western Hemisphere. CCNHC is administered by the City of Denton, Texas.

Sources:

"Orange Skipperling," The Butterflies of the World Foundation, description, range, photographs, accessed 5.7.16, http://www.botwf.org/page165.html

"Species Copaeodes aurantiaca - Orange Skipperling," BugGuide, Department of Entomology, Iowa State University, range map, photographs, classification, resources, accessed 5.7.16, http://bugguide.net/node/view/55868

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

kowen2000

Date

April 27, 2016

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

ID by Tomas Oberbauer (Department of Planning and Land Use, County of San Diego). Location on island is approximate.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Long-tailed Skipper Urbanus proteus

Observer

krancmm

Date

December 14, 2015 01:15 PM CST

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Purplelip Pansy Monkeyflower Diplacus angustatus

Observer

birdgal5

Date

April 29, 2009

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Tioga Gentian Gentiana newberryi ssp. tiogana

Observer

birdgal5

Date

July 23, 2015

Description

Normally, this plant blooms in August/September at this location, but everything seemed to be blooming early here this year!

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Grey Hairstreak Strymon melinus

Observer

krancmm

Date

August 5, 2015 10:11 AM CDT