Journal archives for March 2017

March 31, 2017

eFloraNZ and the Pteridophyte Phylogeny Group

How is the eFloraNZ responding to the classification of ferns and lycophytes that was recently proposed by the global experts in the Pteridophyte Phylogeny Group?

This article, from the New Zealand Botanical Society Newsletter, explains the current plan for the fern and lycophyte chapters of the eFloraNZ, which would see not all of the PPG’s recommendations adopted: https://www.dropbox.com/s/5xl58ntkqwcyr82/eFloraNZ_PPG.pdf.

The relevant genera are Lycopodiella, Lycopodium, Botrychium, Trichomanes, Cyathea, and Blechnum.

About half of the eFloraNZ’s chapters on ferns and lycophytes have been published: http://www.nzflora.info/publications.html

The classification of ferns and lycophytes by the Pteridophyte Phylogeny Group can be read here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jse.12229/epdf

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Posted on March 31, 2017 17:26 by leonperrie leonperrie | 0 comments | Leave a comment

March 10, 2017

Lindsaeaceae eFloraNZ

The eFloraNZ chapter for the Lindsaeaceae has just been published. There are three native species of Lindsaea in New Zealand.
eFloraNZ online: http://www.nzflora.info/factsheet/Taxon/Lindsaeaceae.html
eFloraNZ pdf: http://www.nzflora.info/pdfs/FloraOfNewZealand-Ferns-17-BrownseyPerrie-2017-Lindsaeaceae.pdf

The maps for the eFloraNZ are based on herbarium specimens. They show some interesting patterns (see below). For example, the strong western bias for Lindsaea trichomanoides. And why is it so abundant in the Tararua Ranges but not the axial ranges to the north?

Please let me know of observations that show Lindsaea species to be in areas not recorded on the map. You can either message me through NatureWatch or type @leonperrie into a comment of the relevant observation.


Lindsaea linearis. Fronds only 1-pinnate. Fertile fronds erect, while sterile fronds more-or-less prostrate.


Map for Lindsaea linearis. © Landcare Research 2016 CC-BY 3.0 NZ


Lindsaea trichomanoides. The most common Lindsaea species in New Zealand. The sori curve around the segment apices.


Map of Lindsaea trichomanoides. © Landcare Research 2016 CC-BY 3.0 NZ


Lindsaea viridis. Usually confined to very wet habitats such as stream sides. The frond is similar to that of L. trichomanoides, but the sori are confined to the very apex of the narrow, blunt-ended segments.


Map for Lindsaea viridis. © Landcare Research 2016 CC-BY 3.0 NZ

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Posted on March 10, 2017 21:56 by leonperrie leonperrie | 0 comments | Leave a comment