IIV-31 duplication


You were directed to this page because your observation appears to contain evidence of Invertebrate iridescent virus 31 (IIV-31), and it is requested that you duplicate your observation so this virus may be formally recorded in the database in addition to the host.


Background. IIV-31 is a species of virus that infects Oniscidea (common names: woodlice, terrestiral isopods, slaters, rolly-polies, etc.). The accumulation of virions (virus particles) in the tissues of the hosts forms a crystal-like structure that reflects iridescent blueish-purple light. IIV-31 is rarely observed. The vast majority of hosts show no sign of infection. As such, as of the time of writing, there are only ~150 iNaturalist observations identified as IIV-31 despite there being ~74,000 observations of terrestrial isopods. That's 0.2%. It follows that an observation of IIV-31 is generally of greater scientific value than an observation of the host. This is why it would be appreciated if you could follow the instructions below.


How to duplicate an observation

  • Go to your observation of the terrestrial isopod
  • Click the blue, downwards-pointing arrow button on the top-right of the page, which opens a drop-down list
  • Click Duplicate, which will take you to a new page
  • Write Invertebrate iridescent virus 31 in the text-field on the top-left of the page, below the text What did you see?
  • Click on the blue Save observation button on the bottom-left of the page. You have now duplicated your observation. Thank you.


If you would like to help further. In addition to observing IIV-31 yourself, you are encouraged to post a link to this page whenever you see a terrestrial isopod observation showing evidence of IIV-31 (that has not already been duplicated). Before doing so, ensure you have considered the other potential causes for such colouration; some hosts can be naturally blueish (e.g.: some Porcellionides and Cubaris spp.), false colour under dim lighting (example; this can be determined by asking the observer how it appeared to the naked eye), or use of ultraviolet (UV) light (example). If in doubt you can tag someone who has identified IIV-31 previously.


Posted by jameskdouch jameskdouch, February 23, 2021 10:59

Comments

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I have duplicated all of my IIV-31 observations already. But thank you for this information.

Posted by zoology123 5 days ago (Flag)

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