Icon
Photos / Sounds
Species / Taxon Name
Observer
Place
Actions

Photos / Sounds

What

Blanket Flowers Genus Gaillardia

Observer

danaleeling

Date

July 14, 2019 10:53 AM CDT

Description

The person I was with called this a Gaillardia. Computer vision suggested Rudbeckia. All I can contribute is Asteracea.

Photos / Sounds

What

Common Lantana Lantana camara

Observer

danaleeling

Date

July 10, 2019 04:34 PM CDT

Description

Location is the key here. This is a planted annual. The floret colors are all but meaningless. L. Canada can have almost any color combination.

Photos / Sounds

What

Glade Mallow Napaea dioica

Observer

danaleeling

Date

July 7, 2019 04:18 PM CDT

Description

Purely a computer vision guess. Growing in a shady location. Open to withdrawing this identification.

Photos / Sounds

What

Black Raspberry Rubus occidentalis

Observer

danaleeling

Date

July 7, 2019 01:09 PM CDT

Description

Black raspberries, growing wild in southern Wisconsin

Photos / Sounds

What

Tall Thimbleweed Anemone virginiana

Observer

danaleeling

Date

July 7, 2019 11:59 AM CDT

Description

Based on computer vision, field guide cross-reference, and some good old fashioned Googling.

Photos / Sounds

What

Common Mullein Verbascum thapsus

Observer

danaleeling

Date

July 6, 2019 05:34 PM CDT

Description

Leaves covered with fine hairs.

Photos / Sounds

What

Rock Polypody Polypodium virginianum

Observer

danaleeling

Date

July 6, 2019 02:41 PM CDT

Description

Looks similar to a fern I know from the tropics as Dicranopteris linearis. Growing on a rock outcrop in the forest. Habitat appears consistent with Polypodium virginianum.

Photos / Sounds

What

Holarctic Tree Frogs Genus Hyla

Observer

danaleeling

Date

July 5, 2019 01:07 PM CDT

Description

Seen on Asclepias syriaca. ID is computer vision suggestion.

Photos / Sounds

What

Common Milkweed Asclepias syriaca

Observer

danaleeling

Date

July 5, 2019 01:06 PM CDT

Description

Best guess based on computer vision suggestion

Photos / Sounds

What

Summer Oyster Mushroom Pleurotus pulmonarius

Observer

danaleeling

Date

July 5, 2019 12:29 PM CDT

Description

Computer vision suggestion but third listed. Chose this because CV said this one has been seen nearby.

Photos / Sounds

What

Golden Oyster Mushroom Pleurotus citrinopileatus

Observer

danaleeling

Date

July 5, 2019 12:27 PM CDT

Description

Computer vision suggestion for genus. I am clueless with fungi.

Photos / Sounds

What

Compass Plant Silphium laciniatum

Observer

danaleeling

Date

July 3, 2019 11:35 AM +11

Description

About two meters in height, perhaps a tad taller.

Photos / Sounds

What

Pale Purple Coneflower Echinacea pallida

Observer

danaleeling

Date

June 29, 2019 01:42 PM +11

Description

Greenish stem, paler petals

Photos / Sounds

What

Pale Purple Coneflower Echinacea pallida

Observer

danaleeling

Date

June 29, 2019 01:40 PM +11

Description

Reddish brown stem

Photos / Sounds

What

Foxglove Beardtongue Penstemon digitalis

Observer

danaleeling

Date

June 23, 2019 06:03 PM +11

Description

Computer vision identification. I hope to cross check a local field guide later. Do not agree unless you can independently ID this particular observation.

Photos / Sounds

What

Large-flowered Tickseed Coreopsis grandiflora

Observer

danaleeling

Date

June 20, 2019 10:06 AM +11

Description

This was an observation that initially went up as an unknown

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Butterflies and Moths Order Lepidoptera

Observer

danaleeling

Date

June 20, 2019 10:05 AM +11

Description

Really sorry, this is supposed to be the butterfly! Android app issues!
https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/why-do-some-serious-power-users-add-so-many-unknown-observations/282/80

Photos / Sounds

What

Bluejacket Tradescantia ohiensis

Observer

danaleeling

Date

June 20, 2019 10:05 AM +11

Photos / Sounds

Observer

danaleeling

Date

June 18, 2019

Description

The app is getting confused by being across the dateline. Will try to fix this later.

Identified in the field.

There was a taxonomic change made for S. taccada by Kew and the Kew taxonomy is used by iNaturalist. S. taccada has been split into S. plumieri and S. Sericea. S. taccada is now a synonym for S. plumieri. S. plumieri and S. sericea have precedence over S. taccada. I would note that I was confused and had the temerity to write to Kew and ask about the change, and to my surprise Kew wrote right back:

"The references [to the taxon change] can be found here:
http://plantsoftheworldonline.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:384339-1#bibliography

What you call Scaevola taccada with white fruits is probably now correctly known as S. sericea:

http://plantsoftheworldonline.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:30200356-2

Regards, Rafaël Govaerts
Senior Content Editor – Plant & Fungal Names
Biodiversity Informatics & Spatial Analysis
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Jodrell Laboratory, Kew Road
TW9 3DS, United Kingdom"

The Kew herbarium sheet for S. plumieri http://powo.science.kew.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:384294-1 notes "Fruit blue or black, sub-globose, 10–15 mm. across, very fleshy, drying warty." Thus I now believe that the key photographic distinction will be the fruit color. White will apparently be S. sericea, black or blue will apparently be S. plumieri. Note that the taxon swap has not yet occurred in iNaturalist, thus the white fruited S. taccada cannot yet be IDed as S. sericea, only as S. taccada ssp. sericea. S. plumieri, on the other hand, is an available ID in iNaturalist.

The City of Sanibel Vegetation Committee has a good publication on distinguishing Scaevola plumieri:

https://www.mysanibel.com/content/download/23790/147551

See also example ten at: https://www.iapt-taxon.org/nomen/pages/main/art_41.html for more background on the history of the Scaevola taccada (Gaertn.) Roxb. name:

"Scaevola taccada was validly published by Roxburgh (Hort. Bengal.: 15. 1814) solely by reference to an illustration in Rheede (Hort. Malab. 4: t. 59. 1683) that is associated with a description of a species. Because the same illustration was cited in the protologue of the earlier name Lobelia taccada Gaertn. (Fruct. Sem. Pl. 1: 119. 1788) and the two names apply to the same species, S. taccada is treated as a new combination, S. taccada (Gaertn.) Roxb., not as the name of a new species, even though in Roxburgh’s protologue there is no reference, either direct or indirect, to L. taccada."

Explanation: "The names S. sericea and S. taccada have been very frequently been debated over the last 70 years or more. This all depended on a strict application of the code at the time or a less strict application. So much so that an effort has been made to conserve the name S. taccada as it was the most frequently used name at the time. This application was not accepted as instead the code was adjusted and by using this name as an example (Art 41.4 ex 10 (https://www.iapt-taxon.org/nomen/pages/main/art_41.html?)). " - Robert Archer

Scaevola taccada/Scaevola taccada subsp. sericea/Scaevola sericea "Apart from the white fruit, the thicker stems with the prominent leaf scars and the rounded leaves with its prominent midrib and venation distinguish this species." - Robert Archer, research scientist at South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI)  https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/13343808

Photos / Sounds

What

Common Lantana Lantana camara

Observer

danaleeling

Date

June 16, 2019 08:45 AM +11

Description

This is Lantana camara. Lantana camara was introduced over a century ago on this island and is a self-sustained introduced population. The plant has not proven to be particularly invasive here, the climate is perhaps too wet for Lantana camara to outcompete the many other invasives on the island. Note that the computer vision top choice was Lantana horrida, and Lantana × urticoides was a third option. This, for me, explains the frequent misidentification of Lantana camara as Lantana horrida or Lantana × urticoides.

Note too how the colors shift: the seventh image suggests that some florets were yellow, but to the naked eye they were clearly orange. Exposure choices made by my Motorola Moto G6 altered the colors from what is seen in person.

As for the ID, note the finely toothed margins, the reduced floral bractlets, the flat blade. This observation is a good example of a lantana that does not have the lavender/fuchsia/pink florets but rather has the floret color spectrum of Lantana × urticoides and yet is fully Lantana camara.

Photos / Sounds

What

White Leadtree Leucaena leucocephala

Observer

danaleeling

Date

June 15, 2019 09:56 AM +11

Description

Tentative ID. Known as dangandangan in Pohnpeian due to local phonetics. Up in the Marianas islands the plant is tangantangan. Weedy but not particularly invasive on Pohnpei. Perhaps too wet.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

danaleeling

Date

June 11, 2019 05:35 PM +11

Description

Not Bidens Alba (beggars tick). Smaller floral head, and dandelion like seed dispersal mechanism. Do not recall seeing this one before. Plants are adjacent to where cattle were recently reintroduced to the island. Still need to check local floras to see if this was previously recorded.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

danaleeling

Date

June 9, 2019 10:04 AM +11

Description

The Macaranga came into flower.
Use: firewood, fishnet frames, yellow leaf juice prevents flu in babies, bark stops diarrhea
Kosraean: lo iacp
Pohnpeian: apwid
Chuukese: tuupw, kúrúwén
Yapese: bid, biid, bith

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

South American Amaryllis Genus Hippeastrum

Observer

danaleeling

Date

June 1, 2019

Place

Kolonia (Google, OSM)

Tags

Photos / Sounds

Observer

danaleeling

Date

May 30, 2019 02:42 PM +11

Description

This is the white fruited beach naupaka.

Use: white fruit treats pink eye
English: fan flower
Hawaiian: naupaka kahakai
Marshallese: kōņņat
Kosrae: kusrohsr
Pohnpei: remek
Chuuk: nnét
Woleaian: remag
Yap: noth, thoth, thoeth, nath

There was a taxonomic change made for S. taccada by Kew and the Kew taxonomy is used by iNaturalist. S. taccada has been split into S. plumieri and S. Sericea. S. taccada is now a synonym for S. plumieri. S. plumieri and S. sericea have precedence over S. taccada. I would note that I was confused and had the temerity to write to Kew and ask about the change, and to my surprise Kew wrote right back:

"The references [to the taxon change] can be found here: http://plantsoftheworldonline.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:384339-1#bibliography What you call Scaevola taccada with white fruits is probably now correctly known as S. sericea: http://plantsoftheworldonline.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:30200356-2 Regards, Rafaël Govaerts Senior Content Editor – Plant & Fungal Names Biodiversity Informatics & Spatial Analysis Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew Jodrell Laboratory, Kew Road TW9 3DS, United Kingdom"

The Kew herbarium sheet for S. plumieri http://powo.science.kew.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:384294-1 notes "Fruit blue or black, sub-globose, 10–15 mm. across, very fleshy, drying warty." Thus I now believe that the key photographic distinction will be the fruit color. White will apparently be S. sericea, black or blue will apparently be S. plumieri. Note that the taxon swap has not yet occurred in iNaturalist, thus the white fruited S. taccada cannot yet be IDed as S. sericea, only as S. taccada ssp. sericea. S. plumieri, on the other hand, is an available ID in iNaturalist.

The City of Sanibel Vegetation Committee has a good publication on distinguishing Scaevola plumieri: https://www.mysanibel.com/content/download/23790/147551

See also example ten at: https://www.iapt-taxon.org/nomen/pages/main/art_41.html for more background on the history of the Scaevola taccada (Gaertn.) Roxb. name:
"Scaevola taccada was validly published by Roxburgh (Hort. Bengal.: 15. 1814) solely by reference to an illustration in Rheede (Hort. Malab. 4: t. 59. 1683) that is associated with a description of a species. Because the same illustration was cited in the protologue of the earlier name Lobelia taccada Gaertn. (Fruct. Sem. Pl. 1: 119. 1788) and the two names apply to the same species, S. taccada is treated as a new combination, S. taccada (Gaertn.) Roxb., not as the name of a new species, even though in Roxburgh’s protologue there is no reference, either direct or indirect, to L. taccada."

Explanation of the above note: "The names S. sericea and S. taccada have been very frequently been debated over the last 70 years or more. This all depended on a strict application of the code at the time or a less strict application. So much so that an effort has been made to conserve the name S. taccada as it was the most frequently used name at the time. This application was not accepted as instead the code was adjusted and by using this name as an example (Art 41.4 ex 10 (https://www.iapt-taxon.org/nomen/pages/main/art_41.html?)). " - R. Archer.

Scaevola taccada/Scaevola taccada subsp. sericea/Scaevola sericea "Apart from the white fruit, the thicker stems with the prominent leaf scars and the rounded leaves with its prominent midrib and venation distinguish this species." - Robert Archer, research scientist at South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI) https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/13343808

Photos / Sounds

What

Turmeric Curcuma longa

Observer

danaleeling

Date

February 10, 2018 04:34 PM +11

Description

Use: Added to oil, used on skin burns, used in oil for skin, powdered applied to skin for dancing (Yap), spice added to curry. Young leaves cooked with meat for flavoring.
English: tumeric
Kosrae: ang
Pohnpei: oangitik, kisinieng, kisineoang
Chuuk: áfán, kúchún
Woleaian: yangoshig, yangoshigi
Yap: angorik, guchol

Photos / Sounds

Observer

danaleeling

Date

May 3, 2017 01:17 PM +11

Description

Use: medicinal
Kosrae: puhlah
Pohnpei: iohl
Chuuk: fitaw
Yap: wachatal [north] wangachthal

Bill Raynor always considered this to be a pre-contact introduction thus a native plant of Pohnpei, not an invasive species. I concur with that assessment.

Photos / Sounds

What

Pohnpei Lorikeet Trichoglossus rubiginosus

Observer

danaleeling

Date

May 27, 2019 05:35 PM +11

Description

Only a smartphone camera to work with, but I live here so I will get more opportunities. I am a plant person, so 300 mm lenses and a DSLR is not on my priority buy list. At least not yet. Pohnpei lorikeets often feed at banana blossoms. There are a pair on this blossom. They feed tail up, head down, tail is bright yellow. Known locally as "serehd" this is the Pohnpei state bird.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

danaleeling

Date

May 26, 2019 05:58 PM +11

Description

As far as I know this is a commercial cultivar. Color is being miscaptured. Color is a single tone creamy orange.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

danaleeling

Date

May 26, 2019 05:57 PM +11

Description

As far as I am aware, an introduced commercial cultivar, source species unknown. Color is most accurate in first shot.

Feeds: Atom