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Nature Walk 6/18/21

For my second nature walk, I just walked around my neighborhood as I was running errands. The weather was nice and enjoyable, not too hot and not too cold. Around my neighborhood and Santa Monica in general, I saw lots of palm trees, colorful flowers, and a fair amount of succulents. The first picture I took was of some purple and yellow flowers that grow right outside my building. As I walked further down near the beach, I saw these pink flowers that were so big that they were partially blocking the sidewalk. As I walked towards Montana Ave, I saw these purple flowers that are very prominent in Santa Monica. As I was walking on 4th heading to CVS, I snapped a picture of these palm trees that span 4th St and go down to North Montana. After completing this weeks module, it has become evident to me that palm trees must have some really long xylem and phloem to transport water and sugars up to its leaves at the top. After my way back from CVS, I snapped a picture of some succulents on 3rd St. I never really took in how diverse Santa Monica's plant life is and appreciate it even more now.

Posted on June 18, 2021 22:54 by calebevo calebevo | 5 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Plant-Focused Nature Walk

For this week's nature walk, I went to the same park as last week but decided to take a different walking path for a change of scenery. The park is quite forest-y, with lots of trees, grass, and green plants. It was difficult to find vibrant flowers, but I saw many beautiful green plants nonetheless. First, I found what I believe to be a wineberry plant, which is actually an invasive species that I was surprised to encounter many times throughout my walk. I also found a black cherry tree, which I thought was really pretty, and more duckweeds in the same stream as my previous walk. I was surprised to see that it covered most of the small stream's surface, since it was very sheltered and shaded by trees, so it didn't get much sunlight. Other plants that I observed included moss, some sort of vascular plant with thorns, and two different kinds of ferns. My most curious plant find was my last observation, which had a small thin stem and pink buds at the end. During my walk I also encountered some other organisms, like a blue dragonfly, a white butterfly, and a cute little family of geese.

Posted on June 18, 2021 22:32 by kkitrick kkitrick | 11 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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6/18/21 - Yellow Loosestrife

As summer really sets in, there seems to be lull in bee diversity in many habitats. Plenty of generalists and introduced species to keep us busy, but the spring ephemerals and flowering shrubs are winding down and the fall asteraceae specialists are still a ways off. There are, however, several rare specialists that likely require dedicated searching to find.

The Loosestrife Bees (genus Macropis) are probably the rarest genera known from VT, but their host plants, all in the genus Lysimachia, are relatively common and widespread. Whorled Loosestrife (L. quadrifolia) is blooming now, in dry and/or sandy areas and the other species will follow soon and continue through early August. Huge kudos to anyone who photographs one of these fascinating bees!

More details on the target bees here:
https://val.vtecostudies.org/projects/vtbees/macropis/

Posted on June 18, 2021 21:08 by beeboy beeboy | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Waterfall Glen Nature Walk in Lemont, IL-- 6/14/21

Hello, I am back for my second nature walk! This week, I really focused on observing the plants around me. I am back home in Illinois, so I enlisted 2 of my friends to go hiking with me at a beautiful forest preserve nearby called Waterfall Glen. We hiked for about 2 hours, and it was a perfect day! The sun was shining, it was about 78 degrees (so not as hot and humid as Texas), the trails weren't crowded, and there was a light breeze. My first general impression about the trails was that everything was just SO GREEN! It was beautiful! We were completely surrounded by lush vegetation, and the trees were so tall that they provided such beautiful shade. It is crazy to think that the tall trees, mostly angiosperms, that provide such cooling shade only appeared in the fossil record about 145 million years ago, and have been the abundant plants since. I wonder what the planet looked like before angiosperms were so diverse and abundant? It is really not that long ago in geologic time when such large plant groups existed. It would seem so strange to walk around an Earth with only flat, low-lying plants. I guess in terms of plants, we used to have a flat Earth, haha! It's cool to think about how different adaptations, importantly vascular tissue, allowed trees to reach such great heights. I also wonder if without the angiosperms to provide shade, if we would still see the biodiversity that exists in other plants and also animals today. I think the trees and their provided a habitat and suitable climate that allowed many organisms to thrive. Another random shower-type thought I often ponder is the fact that the only reason so many plants are green is due to the shared presence of chlorophyll a and b. If chlorophyll reflect a different wavelength of light, say purple, we would have a purple planet! I bet the selection for chlorophyll has something to do with the spectrum of light the sun emits and which wavelengths are most abundant, and also with which wavelengths chlorophyll absorbs to do photosynthesis. I also believe the ubiquitous green color of plants support the fact that there was just one single transition from freshwater alga to life on land for plants! During my walk, I saw a few flowers of different colors on plants, and they were so pretty. For example, I saw a yellow Creeping Buttercup, clover flowers, and some purple flowers of the genus Securigera. I wonder how different this trail looks in the spring when all of the flowers are blooming at once? I bet it is so colorful and lively with pollinators! I also saw one plant, a Black Raspberry plant, with fruit on it. I find it so cool that fruit is one adaptation that allows for further seed dispersal. This is such a fascinating example of how plants utilize animals to their advantage to help spread their genetic information!
One of my favorite things about observing plants was noticing how much diversity there was in leaves. The first thing I noticed was that sometimes leaves come in groups of 3, sometimes 5, and sometimes 6, for example. For someone who really knows their plants, this is probably helpful in plant identification. I also noticed that some leaves were rounder, some were very skinny, some large, and some very small. I wonder what selection pressures caused so many different leaf shapes and sizes? Something I did notice about every leaf is how waxy it was. I learned that this is the cuticle, and it was one of the main adaptations that allowed plants to transition to land. It prevents the plants from drying out. In class, we listened to a very interesting episode of the Ologies podcast called "Bryology" with Dr. Robin Kimmerer. To be honest, before listening to this podcast, I didn't really know what a moss was. I thought it was just some type of unwanted plant that forms on the ground. This actually happened to be one of the most interesting episodes of Ologies though! I really like thinking about mosses now as miniature forests that are teeming with invertebrate inhabitants and a mini ecosystem existing within them. I was also fascinated to learn that mosses have antimicrobial properties, and that some animals (such as Caribou, or birds in their nests), use these antimicrobial properties to their advantage! I love how closely all organisms on Earth work together to thrive and flourish (that is when they are not being pathogens or parasites). I was also so intrigued that some indigenous populations use moss as a diaper because of its absorbent properties. Because of all this, I was determined to find a moss. I could not find one, and then my friend randomly goes, "Hey Courtney want a picture of some moss," and I was like "of course!" She was a little surprised by my excitement, but I was once like her and thought mosses were completely useless.
My favorite park of Waterfall Glen is of course... the waterfall (although it's actually a dam). When we got to the waterfall, I saw a lot of green algae, which I learned is in the kingdom Plantae, but is actually a protist, but is closely related to land plants, and so plant has a very different colloquial and scientific meaning, ugh. Nonetheless, the algae were cool to see covering the rocks, even though they made the rocks very slippery! We need to be thankful for these slippery things though because they are such important primary producers in aquatic ecosystems! Last summer when I went to waterfall glen with my sister, we saw a huge watersnake, so I was so determined to find one again! My friends didn't believe me that they existed at Waterfall Glen, so when a super long one darted out from under a rock while we were crossing the stream, they were in for a big surprise! We also so a lot of crayfish in the river, some spiders on the rocks, and lots of beautiful damselflies near the stream (which, like dragonflies, I think are so, so pretty). One of the weirdest non-plant things I saw on this hike was a bunch of white "spit" on a tree. I was so confused what the white foam was. I did some research and learned that this is created by spittlebugs! I guess their name is very fitting for the frothy mess they create when they eat plants!
This was overall a very successful, fun, informative walk. I saw so many different kinds of plants, and now that I have learned about the complexities that exist with plants beyond what meets the eye (such as alternation of generations, different modes of reproduction, their metabolism, and more), I am so much more appreciative of the beautiful landscape they create!

Posted on June 18, 2021 20:29 by courtney_redey courtney_redey | 50 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Nie pytaj, co w trawie piszczy

Zapytaj - a w jakiej?

Posted on June 18, 2021 20:25 by kroolik kroolik | 5 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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First "safari" - June 26, Amherst Lake (Plymouth VT)

Come join the fun! Parking must be done politely along Scout Camp Road, please be considerate of residents and other recreationists. ** THERE ARE NO BATHROOM ACCOMMODATIONS at the boat landing...please be aware and you may need to drive to the nearest facility. **

(Coordinates to boat landing are here: 43.490654, -72.707873)

I plan to get started about 11 AM and wrap up about 2 PM, but nothing precludes you from starting sooner or ending sooner, or staying for a shorter period.

BYO boat (and all the gear that implies, such as life vests for everyone in the craft), drinking water, snacks, bug & sun protection, camera or phone capable of taking good, clear photos, and a couple of empty, clean, dry containers such as prescription bottles or gelato jars for collecting exuviae.

Get an overview of the project and how to find and collect exuviae: https://youtu.be/zxZrvfwi9Es

Zip me a note if you are planning to join the fun on the 26th! blackrivercleanup (at) gmail (dot) com

Posted on June 18, 2021 20:22 by blackriverbrat blackriverbrat | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Welcome to the Justicia Pollinators Project / Bienvenidos al Proyecto Polinizadores de Justicia

The Justicia Pollinators Project archives iNaturalist observations showing interactions between Justicia (Acanthaceae) plants and animals that visit their flowers. Species of Justicia have flowers with many different colors, shapes, and sizes to attract pollinators. In some plants, flower traits are correlated with particular groups of animal pollinators. For example, hummingbirds often drink nectar from flowers that are red with long corolla tubes. The iNaturalist observations in this project can show us what animals are visiting flowers of Justicia species and if these interactions are consistent with what we would expect from the flower’s color, shape, and size.

The observations added to this project will be annotated using the Observation Fields section. The annotations will be added as interactions of a “visited flower of” the Justicia species and “‘flower visited by” the animal visitor. These annotations will allow the observations to be included in Global Biotic Interactions (GloBI), an open-access database for species interaction data, and make Justicia plant-animal interactions easily available to other scientists.

The larger goals of this project are to describe the Justicia-pollinator relationships to understand how flowers evolve, protect plants and their pollinators, and encourage the general public to participate in research. Through iNaturalist, we aim to engage community scientists in our Justicia research and showcase this wonderful group of flowering plants and their diverse animal pollinators.

This project has been created by Josephine Rodriguez, Yuting Wang, Laura Abonce, and Amanda Fisher at California State University, Long Beach. The project is funded by NSF award #1754792 and is in collaboration with Dr. Lucinda McDade (California Botanic Garden), Dr. Carrie Kiel (California Botanic Garden), and Dr. Erin Tripp (Colorado University, Boulder).


American water willow, or Justicia americana, at Blanco Shoals Natural Area in San Marcos, Texas. Photographed by Amanda Fisher. iNaturalist users have observed butterflies, moths, bees, flies, and beetles on the flowers of this species.

“American water willow,” o Justicia americana, en el Área Natural Blanco Shoals en San Marcos, Texas. Fotografiada por Amanda Fisher. Los usuarios de iNaturalist han observado mariposas, polillas, abejas, moscas y escarabajos en las flores de esta especie.


A Hylephila phyleus fiery skipper butterfly visiting a Justicia americana flower. Observed by Kala Murphy King near Dallas, Texas (https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/13240431). The black, tubular mouthpart extended from the butterfly into the flower tube is called a proboscis. The proboscis is used like a straw to drink the nectar located at the base of the flower tube.

Una mariposa Hylephila phyleus “fiery skipper” visitando una flor de Justicia americana. Observada por Kala Murphy King cerca de Dallas, Texas (https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/13240431). La parte bucal negra y tubular que se extiende desde la mariposa hasta el tubo de la flor se llama probóscide. La probóscide se usa como una pajilla para beber el néctar que se encuentra en la base del tubo de la flor.


Chuparosa, or Justicia californica, at the Philip L. Boyd Deep Canyon Desert Research Center, part of the University of California Natural Reserve System, near Palm Springs, California. Photographed by Amanda Fisher. This species has red flowers and a long corolla tube.

Chuparosa, o Justicia californica, en el Centro de Investigación del Desierto del Cañón Profundo llamado Philip L.Boyd es parte del Sistema de Reservas Naturales de la Universidad de California, que esta cerca de Palm Springs, California. Fotogriafada por Amanda Fisher. Esta especie tiene flores rojas y el tubo de la corola es largo.

A Calothorax lucifer lucifer hummingbird visiting a Justicia californica flower. Observed by Laura Keene near Cochise, Arizona (https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/161046591). Hummingbirds are attracted to red flowers, and their long bills and tongues are able to reach nectar at the base of this flower’s long corolla tube.

Un colibrí Calothorax lucifer “lucifer hummingbird” visitando una flor de Justicia californica. Observado por Laura Keene cerca de Cochise, Arizona (https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/161046591). Los colibríes son atraídos por las flores rojas, y sus largos picos y lenguas pueden alcanzar el néctar en la base del largo tubo de la corola de esta flor.

Images used with permission / Imágenes utilizadas con permiso

El proyecto Polinizadores de Justicia es una colección de observaciones de iNaturalist que muestran interacciones entre plantas Justicia (Acanthaceae) y animales que visitan sus flores. Las especies de Justicia tienen flores con diferentes colores, formas y tamaños que atraen a polinizadores. En algunas plantas, las características florales están correlacionadas con grupos particulares de animales polinizadores. Por ejemplo, los colibríes beben néctar de flores rojas que tienen corolas con tubos largos. Las observaciones de iNaturalist incluidas en este proyecto pueden mostrarnos que animales están visitando las flores de las especies de Justicia y si estas interacciones son consistentes con lo que podríamos esperar del color, la forma y el tamaño de la flor.

Las observaciones agregadas a este proyecto serán anotadas en la sección de detalles de observación. Las anotaciones serán detalladas con las interacciones de "flor visitada de" la especie de Justicia y "flor visitada por" el animal visitante. Estas anotaciones permitirán que las observaciones sean incluidas en la base de datos de “Global Biotic Interactions” (GloBI), que es de acceso abierto para información de interacciones entre especies, y harán que las interacciones planta-animal sean mas fácilmente disponibles para otros científicos.

Las metas mas amplias de este proyecto son describir las relaciones Justicia-polinizador para entender como evolucionan las flores, proteger a las plantas y sus polinizadores, y animar al publico en general que participen en investigaciones. A través de iNaturalist, esperamos involucrar a los científicos de la comunidad en nuestra investigación de Justicia y exhibir este grupo maravilloso de plantas con flor y sus diversos animales polinizadores.

Este proyecto ha sido creado por Josephine Rodriguez, Yuting Wang, Laura Abonce, y Amanda Fisher en la Universidad Estatal de California, Long Beach. El proyecto está financiado por el premio NSF # 1754792 y está en colaboración con la Dra. Lucinda McDade (Jardín Botánico de California), la Dra. Carrie Kiel (Jardín Botánico de California) y la Dra. Erin Tripp (Universidad de Colorado, Boulder).

Posted on June 18, 2021 19:25 by jorodriguez jorodriguez | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Midge Gall Wishlist

A list of midge galls I would like to find, some of which are present here to some extent, but none widely reported.

Presented here in case anybody else wants to look for some of these. List relevant for Eastern/Midwest US.

Ametrodiplosis geminata – Mountain mint, midsummer - bud gall
Asphondylia autumnalis – Helenium autumnale - swollen, globular leafy bud gall
Asphondylia azaleae – Rhododendron – Enlarged bud
Asphondylia diervillae – Northern Bush Honeysuckle – Enlarged deformed bud or fruit (often sickle-shaped)
Asphondylia hydrangeae – Hydrangea arborescens – enlarged bud
Asphondylia lacinariae – Liatris pycnostachya – spherical bud gall
Asphondylia recondita – Asters - rosette gall
Asphondylia sambuci – Elderberry - bud gall
Asphondylia smilacinae – Smilacina racemosa – deformed berry
Asphondylia silva – Bluestem goldenrod –
Asphondylia thalictri – Thalictrum sp. – enlarged seed pod
Celticecis wellsi - Celtis occidentalis - leaf gall
Clinodiplosis apocyni – hemp dogbane - swollen flower bud
Clinodiplosis lappa – Spiraea salicifolia – narrow elongate clustered buds
Clinodiplosis meibomiifoliae – tick trefoil – swollen, aborted bud gall
Clinodiplosis rhododendri – Rhododendron – rolled distorted young leaf
Clinodiplosis hastata – Verbena hastata – marginal leaf roll
Contarinia citrina – Tilia americana – swollen young bud or twig
Contarinia juniperiana – Juniper sp. – Slight swelling at base of needle
Contarinia nucicola – hickory – surface swelling of husk
Contarinia pyrivora – Pyrus communis – enlarged sterile fruitlet
Cystiphora canadensis – Nabalus – circular leaf spot
Dasineura americana – Galium asprellum – swollen aborted bud
Dasineura anemone – Anemone canadensis – slightly englarged bud
Dasineura aromaticae – Mentha arvensis, Mentha spicata – crumpled, folded, young leaf
Dasineura collinsoniae – Collinsonia canadensis – onion shaped leaf gall
Dasineura dentatae – chestnut – flat, circular, warty growth, usually between veins
Dasineura folliculi – Solidago
Dasineura johnsoni – Vitis spp – deformed fruit
Dasineura laquerrarum – Mountain mint – small bud gall
Dasineura lepidii – Lepidium (peppergrass) infested swollen seed capsule (darker color)
Dasineura lysimachiae – Lysimachia quadrifolia, terrestris – swollen terminal bud
Dasineura mali – Apple – Curled leaf
Dasineura meibomiae – tick trefoil – hard, elongate-oval bud gall
Dasineura parthenocissi – Virginia Creeper - fleshy vein fold gall
Dasineura piperitae – Mentha gentilis, Mentha piperita – Swollen bud
Dasineura plicata – Salix sp. – Rolled leaf
Dasineura porrecta – Ulmus americana – deformed samara
Dasineura pseudacaciae – black locust – tightly folded swollen leaflet
Dasineura pyri – Pyrus communis – curled leaf
Dasineura rhodophaga – Roses (cultivated) – curled and stunted buds
Dasineura sassafras – Sassafras – curled leaf/leaf margin
Dasineura semenivora – Viola spp – enlarged, deformed, onion shaped fruit
Dasineura serrulatae – Alder bud gall
Dasineura smilacifolia – Smilax spp – reddened marginal leaf roll
Dasineura toweri – Hypericum mutilum – enlarged seed capsule
Dasineura trifolii – Clover – folded and swollen along midvein, on introduced European Trifolium species
Dasineura ulmae – Ulmus americana – enlarged leaf bud
Dasineura urnicola – Urtica dioica - Pale green midrib or vein gall, subsessile, diameter yi inch, midge
Iteomyia salicifolia – Salix sp – spherical gall protruding from only one side of leaf
Janetiella asplenifolia – Myrica asplenifolia – swollen vein, severe leaf distortion
Lasioptera collinsonifolia – Collinsonia – swollen midrib/lateral vein
Lasioptera cylindrigallae – Euthamina – tapered stem swelling (base of stem)
Lasioptera excavata – Crataegus sp. – Circular leaf spot
Lasioptera humulicaulis – Humulus - swollen stem
Lasioptera lactucae – Lactuca canadensis - tapered stem swelling, woody
Lasioptera lorrainae – Mountian mint - spherical stem gall
Lasioptera spiraeafolia – Spiraea densiflora, douglasii, salicifolia – circular leaf spot
Macrodiplosis castaneae – Chestnut – smooth, globular leaf fold
Meunieriella aquilonia – honey locust – ovoid leaf blister
Neolasioptera brevis – honey locust – swollen stem
Neolasioptera clematidis – Clematis – tapered stem swelling
Neolasioptera convolvuli – Bindweed – Tapered stem swelling
Neolasioptera cornicola – Cornus stolonifera – tapered ridged stem swelling
Neolasioptera desmodii – tick trefoil – swollen stem
Neolasioptera fontagrensis – Celastrus scandens – swollen stem
Neolasioptera galeosidis – Galeopsis – irregular stem swelling
Neolasioptera hibisci – Hibiscus – swollen stem
Neolasioptera linderae – Lindera benzoin – irregular stem swellling
Neolasioptera lycopi – Lycopus – swollen stem
Neolasioptera menthae – Mentha sp. – Swollen stem
Neolasioptera monardi – Monarda fistulosa – tapered stem swelling
Neolasioptera nodulosa – native Rubus – swollen stem
Neolasioptera pierrei – Elderberrry - stem swelling
Neolasioptera triadenii – Triadenum virginicum – irregular stem swelling
Neolasioptera viburnicola – viburnum dentatum – swollen stem
Olpodiplosis helianthi – Helianthus - tubular node gall
Prodiplosis myricae – Myrica cerifera – swollen bud, rolled leaf
Prodiplosis morrisi – Populus sp. – rolled leaf/curled leaf margin
Prodiplosis platani – Platanus occidentalis – rolled leaf margin/distorted leaf
Prodiplosis violicola – Viola spp. – rolled deforemed leaf
Resseliella tulipiferae – Tulip tree – leaf vein swelling
Rabdophaga cephalanthi – Cephalanthus occidentalis – swollen stem
Rabdophaga saliciscornu – Salix humilis (?) – lateral bud deformed into thin-walled horn-like structure
Rabdophaga salicistriticoides – Salix cordata, Salix humilis - forshortened twig, buds close together, resembling a wheat head
Rhopalomyia castanae – Chestnut – enlarged clustered buds
Rhopalomyia chrysanthemi – cone shaped leaf galls cultivated chrysanthemums
Rhopalomyia grossulariae – Ribes grossularia – enlarged deforemed bud
Rhopalomyia lobata – Euthamia - spongy apical gall
Rhopalomyia hirtipes – Solidago junacea - hard, globular apical gall
Rhopalomyia strobiligemma – Panicled aster – rosette gall
Rhopalomyia weldi – Bigleaf Aster, Spring
Sackenomyia commota – virburnum circular leaf blister
Sackenomyia viburnifolia – viburnum dentatum – purple vein swelling
Schizomyia umbellicola – Elderberry large unopened flower
Schizomyia viburni – Viburnum enlarged blossom or bud

Posted on June 18, 2021 18:59 by calconey calconey | 1 comment | Leave a comment
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Bird Skull and Pelvis vs Mammal Skull and Pelvis

When IDing bones, one of the most common mistakes I come across is confusion between bird and mammal skulls and pelvises. Not just confusing a bird pelvis for a mammal one, but often a bird skull for a mammal pelvis. Since this is so common, I decided to have a post with a more in depth explanation.

I will be using a Domestic Muscovy Duck (Cairina moschata var. domestica) and Gray Fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) to demonstrate.

From left to right: Duck pelvis, duck skull, fox skull, fox pelvis.
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First I will start with the most common mistake of this order confusion, mistaking a bird pelvis as a mammal skull. Most of the confusion seems to come from the bird pelvis' acetabulum, circled below.
(see also, Parts of a bird pelvis: https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/lizardking/30724-parts-of-a-bird-pelvis)

(Left, duck pelvis, right, fox skull.)
This is where the femur articulates into the pelvis. However, its perfectly circle shape is often mistaken as an eye socket. As you can see on the fox skull, eye sockets aren't actually that clean and circle. It is a very common mistake though, and I will also detail some ways to tell the bone is a pelvis, and not a skull.

(Left, duck pelvis, right, fox skull.)
Both the duck pelvis and fox skull have a similar form, a wider posterior (back) and then a more narrow anterior (front), the fox's snout seeming analogous to the duck's anterior. That, however, when turned upside-down, is revealed to be not dental and nasal structures, but fused vertebra.

(Left, duck pelvis, right, fox skull.)
Bird bones have to be very efficient. Strong, supportive, but light weight. They have a lot of fusion, and the pelvic girdle is a great example of this. Much of the lower spine is fused to be part of the pelvis. So while the anterior of a mammal skull should have teeth or holes for teeth, the anterior of a bird pelvis -and its entire length- has fused vertebra.
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Second is a less obvious, but still common, confusion.
When bird skulls have their beaks, they are typically easily distinguishable from mammal skulls. I have seen confusion when the bill is broken off, and also on occasion rabbit skulls being confused for avian. The easiest way to tell an avian skull from a mammalian one is the rounded "bump", or occipital condyle, on the skull, around the foramen magnum, or the opening at the back of the skull the spinal cord runs through. Birds have one, right under the center of the foramen magnum, and mammals have two, on either side of the opening.


Left, duck skull, single arrow pointing to it's single occipital condyle. Right, fox skull, arrows pointing to both occipital condyles.

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And last is a less common, but still frequent cause of confusion, mistaking bird and mammal pelvis.

(Left, duck pelvis, right, fox pelvis)
As said above, bird bones have incredible efficiency of strength and lightness, and fusion is one mechanism that helps achieve this. Mammals don't have this same need, and the structure of their pelvises appear far more simplistic. Bird pelvic girdles have a lot of spine fused to the pelvic bones, where mammals lack any apparent vertebra in their structure.


(Left, duck pelvis, right, fox pelvis)
Also discussed earlier, the circle opening confused for an eye socket is actually the acetabulum, where the femur attaches to the pelvis. In mammals, this is less of an opening and more of a crater or indent. The spherical indent on the side of the pelvis is the fox's acetabulum.
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This is an overview, a general explanation to help educate and also to explain my own personal ID corrections, but I can gladly explain aspects more in depth, and as always, I am always open to help with anything bird bone related. Lee Post has an excellent book that covers how to differentiate the entire avian skeleton from mammalian, The Bird Building Book.

Posted on June 18, 2021 18:31 by lizardking lizardking | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Hessen vorn!

Liebe Beobachterinnen und Beobachter,
es ist Zeit für ein großes Dankeschön! In unserem Projekt "Flora und Rote Liste von Hessen" sind bereits über 54.000 Beobachtungen eingegangen und die Zahl steigt täglich.
Alles, was wir in Hessen beobachten, fließt natürlich auch in das Projekt "Flora von Deutschland" ein. Dieses Projekt verfügt derzeit über mehr als 387.000 Beobachtungen. Das bedeutet, dass die hessischen Beobachtungen derzeit etwa 14 % aller Beobachtungen ausmachen, fast jede siebte Beobachtung in der Deutschland-Flora stammt aus Hessen.
Das ist ein toller Wert, wenn man bedenkt, dass Hessen gerade einmal 5,9 % der Fläche Deutschlands ausmacht und - so dichtbesiedelt es uns in Rhein-Main auch vorkommen mag - die Hessen stellen gerade einmal 7,5 % der deutschen Bevölkerung.
Dass wir fast doppelt so viele Beobachtungen beitragen, wie statistisch zu erwarten wäre, kann nur eines bedeuten: in Hessen gibt es besonders fleißige Beobachterinnen und Beobachter!
Euch und Ihnen ein großes Dankeschön für diesen Beitrag zur Kenntnis unserer Pflanzenwelt!!!

Und wenn am Wochenende die angesagten Gewitter kommen oder man sich vor lauter Hitze nicht aus dem Haus traut, kann man sich trotzdem weiterhin mit der hessischen Flora beschäftigen. Derzeit warten noch über 14.000 Beobachtungen auf eine ID, das sind 26,6 %, also mehr als jede vierte Beobachtung. Damit steht Hessen zwar ebenfalls gut da, denn bei der "Flora von Deutschland" ist es mit 32,4 % fast jede dritte Beobachtung, die nicht abschließend bewertet ist. Dennoch bleibt noch viel zu tun!
Natürlich sollte man nur Arten bestätigen, die man auch sicher erkennt. Mit Hilfe der Webseite www.blumeninschwaben.de kann man sich beispielsweise die Merkmale nochmal im Detail ansehen und so seine Kenntnisse in der Pflanzenbestimmung nach für nach verbessern.
Hilfe ist auch gefragt bei der Identifizierung von Gartenblumen und Parkbäumen, die versehentlich ohne die Kennzeichnung als "nicht wild" hochgeladen wurden. Oft muss zur Klärung der Beobachter kontaktiert werden - ein zeitaufwändiger Prozess, für den man aber nicht Botanik studiert haben muss :-)
Aber auch damit kann man zur Qualität der Daten beitragen, damit diese für wissenschaftliche Auswertungen verwendet werden können.

Bei einer aktuellen Bearbeitung einer Pflanzenfamilie für die "Beiträge zur Pflanzenwelt in Hessen" https://botanik-hessen.de/Pflanzenwelt/ wurden nun erstmals auch unsere Projekt-Daten ausgewertet und konnten einige interessante Funde beitragen. In Zukuft werden die Beobachtungsdaten eine wachsende Rolle spielen.

In diesem Sinne hoffe ich, dass Hessen auch weiterhin die Nase vorn hat und wünsche uns allen einen Sommer voller interessanter Pflanzen-Entdeckungen!
Das Zebra

Posted on June 18, 2021 18:28 by zebra1193 zebra1193 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Nature Walk 2

I decided for my second nature walk to go back to Bartlett Arboretum and Gardens, the same place I did my first walk. The same group went with me, my dog, and mom, and we decided to take two different trails from our first trip. The temperature was colder than last time, making the walk more enjoyable; it was 75ºC during my walk on Thursday. The walk started at 3:10, and we walked for roughly 30 minutes this time. I took A little more observations this time and saw different ferns, angiosperms, and gymnosperms. There were fewer gymnosperms on the walk, but I still saw one or two of them. I like walking at Bartlett even though I wish there were more land, but still, it has great trails. Nature walks are more entertaining when you can classify plants from an angiosperm and a gymnosperm or whether the angiosperm is a monocot or dicot. These walks are rewarding, and I love that this is an aspect of this class.

Posted on June 18, 2021 17:58 by christiand0826 christiand0826 | 15 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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New required question - feedback welcome!

Hi everyone,

We added a required question about the 'percentage of trees that are unhealthy' to get a better understanding of the severity of dieback at each site. Please let us know if that question is annoying or confusing!

Your feedback is important and we encourage you to help shape this project. How can it be improved?

As always, feel free to reach out to us with any feedback, questions or suggestions. You can get in touch by contacting us, messaging @jmhulbert, commenting below, or emailing foresthealthwatch@gmail.com.

Posted on June 18, 2021 17:37 by jmhulbert jmhulbert | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Great Blue Heron

https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/lizardking/37605-white-ibis-skeleton

Wish bone


sternum

sternum and vertebra


vertebra

wing girdle;
humerus, coracoid, scapula


coracoid, scapula

corcaoid

humeurs

both wings

femur

tibiotarsus

Posted on June 18, 2021 17:32 by lizardking lizardking | 1 observation | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Hello iNaturalist world!

Hello iNaturalist world!

We are excited to share Smithsonian MarineGEO’s first iNaturalist journal post and provide a bit of background on our iNaturalist projects and goals.

Who are we?

Like other iNaturalist projects, MarineGEO iNaturalist is a collaboration between the Smithsonian Institution’s Marine Global Earth Observatory (MarineGEO) and Tennenbaum Marine Observatories Network, partnering with the Florida Museum of Natural History (FLMNH), the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, our many, global network partners, and of course you -- the far-flung iNaturalist community!

Our MarineGEO network of partners conducts research around the world to take the pulse of coastal ocean life. We aim to advance knowledge that supports innovative solutions for coastal and marine ecosystems, biodiversity conservation, and human-ocean interactions. A crucial part of that work involves expert marine biodiversity assessments, which we are excited to contribute to the interactive iNaturalist platform. Our consortium of partners is a critical component of this data sharing process and we are excited to share this with all of you!

iNaturalist Projects

Smithsonian MarineGEO is launching a dedicated iNaturalist project for each of our partner sites to make knowledge of local marine biodiversity publicly available. This includes both expert-vetted images and identifications from the MarineGEO network’s field campaigns, as well as observations by the keen community of marine naturalists around the world.

Marine invertebrates comprise a huge fraction of our planet’s animal diversity, and many ocean life forms are completely unfamiliar to terrestrial beings. The observations in MarineGEO’s iNaturalist projects would not be possible without the collaboration, taxonomic expertise, and contributions of brilliant photos by our partners. Most importantly, Gustav Paulay’s group at the Florida Museum of Natural History has contributed, to date, over 5,300 expert-vetted observations to several MarineGEO projects on iNaturalist.

Our main goal is to provide user-friendly resources to identify local flora and fauna at each of our partner sites via a comprehensive illustrated list of the local marine animals and plants, updated continuously and confirmed by experts and community members. Each project has a cohesive look and feel and nests within the MarineGEO umbrella project. The projects include only marine (and estuarine) organisms. The scientific observations are taxonomically validated against the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) before uploading to ensure the most up to date taxonomic names are included.

To date, we have 11 project sites and iNaturalist pages in these locations (in alphabetical order by country):

Tasmania, Australia
Carrie Bow Caye, Belize (@carriebowbiodiversity)
British Columbia, Canada (@hakaiinstitute)
Hong Kong, China
Bocas del Toro, Panama (@bocasresearchstation)
Central Coast, Peru
Madeira, Portugal (@mare-madeira)
Chesapeake Bay, Edgewater, Maryland, United States (@sercfisheries)
Friday Harbor, Washington, United States
Indian River Lagoon, Fort Pierce, Florida, United States
Kāne’ohe Bay, O’ahu, Hawai’i, United States
Wachapreague, Virginia, United States

We are very excited about this project and look forward to building it with you as the MarineGEO network grows and we expand field campaigns to assess marine biodiversity around the world.

Finally, a critical part of our MarineGEIO team is you -- the iNaturalist community that has generously given your time, expertise, and judgement to identify species, correct errors, pose thoughtful questions, and help strengthen identifications of marine organisms. The community component of iNaturalist is one we greatly value and look forward to continuing to engage with!

Please keep an eye out for future journal posts (some inspired by questions from you all!) and be sure to follow us on Twitter (@SImarineGEO) for more MarineGEO network news!

Thanks to all who have helped get us here and looking forward to continued conversations and observations of cool marine organisms!

Posted on June 18, 2021 17:11 by smithsonian_marinegeo smithsonian_marinegeo | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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майник

столько лет жила в тех краях и никогда не обращала внимания.. он чудесный, этот майник)

Posted on June 18, 2021 16:11 by lenatara lenatara | 1 observation | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Contribute your data to the Odolympics!

Some of us at the Dragonfly Society of the Americas and Sociedad de Odonatología Latinoamericana are real data geeks, and OdonataCentral provides some really useful tools for mapping the distribution of dragonflies and damselflies.

Here is a heat map of all sightings in June (this map was created in seconds, BTW).

And here is a similar map created in iNaturalist.

These maps show two things: For one, we need more submissions from Central and South America! And secondly, it shows there are still many unexplored places, even in heavily sampled regions like the US.

What are you going to discover during this year’s Odolympics on June 19-27?

Posted on June 18, 2021 15:33 by colindjones colindjones | 1 comment | Leave a comment
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Nature Walk Two

Yesterday, I went on a hike at Wilson Mountain on the Needham/Dedham line about five minutes away from my house. I had been there once before, but my friend and I tried to hike to the highest point of the mountain. We came across some really interesting plants and trees, as well as many insects all around. My friend informed me that barn owls frequented the trees of this mountain, but we sadly did not see any. We also kept an eye out for snakes which I have seen the last time I was there but thankfully we did not come across any. We found many plants along the path, and came across many tree trunks and plants growing out of fallen trees. There was a ton of greenery but it was cool to search for interesting and different plants. Unfortunately our hike was cut short due to my friend's allergic reaction to a bug bite, but I hope to go back soon and explore more!

Posted on June 18, 2021 15:27 by frankiefaggiano frankiefaggiano | 14 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Project Launch Day

Welcome! I have started this project because in the past two weeks I have observed eight species of Cryptorhynchinae at a single address in Martin's Corner, West Caln Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania, USA, and I'm fascinated by these little critters. In all of North America to date there are only 798 iNat Observations (although BugGuide and the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) database have more), so it appears that this subfamily of Beetles is relatively understudied. I am not an entomologist, so I don't bring any specialized knowledge to the table, but I do want to learn, and I hope this project will attract the attention of some experts who can help us all out with positive identifications.

At the outset, site stats show that of the 798 continental Observations, 152 are of the Poplar-and-Willow Borer, Cryptorhynchus lapathi. 55 species are represented, with 484 Observers and 153 Identifiers.

I look forward to exploring the data we collect and learning more about each of these 55 species!

Cheers,

kidneymoth

Posted on June 18, 2021 15:21 by kidneymoth kidneymoth | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Odolympics Start Tomorrow - June 19, 2021

What kind of totals are possible for the Odolympics on June 19-27? In the US, there are over 400 species recorded in June. Canada has over 180. Costa Rica has 90. Brazil has 60. In some states and provinces, it may even be possible to see over 100 species, though that would require a ton of effort! Who is going to find the most diversity, and collectively, what regions are going to be best represented by the Odolympics? We can’t wait to find out!

Check out this map representing the regional diversity of Odonata in June (from GBIF).

Posted on June 18, 2021 15:20 by colindjones colindjones | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Summer is here

Hi everyone,

Cheers for another great week! Plenty of brilliant observations - my favourite this week is the horned palassus beetle from Loogna in Tennessee. Check it out, it's huge!

We've had some brilliant weather and hopefully it will be here for most of the summer (next week excluded!) - it's the perfect chance to take your time exploring nature and looking for wildlife. Every single record you make is so important. Each of them help scientists learn more about the biodiversity of that area and how best to protect it.

Now that the weather has picked up, we are starting to take Wild Watch to schools. We had our first session the other day at an after school club near Chester. The children had great fun finding all sorts of insects and arachnids in their school garden. This was definitely helped by the purchase of insect viewing pots (small plastic pots with a magnified lid - they're only about £1.50 online or in our gift shop). We also gave them sheets to mark how many species they found in each microhabitat in the garden - I let them decide which areas constituted a microhabitat, so we had a chance to discuss what a habitat is and what sort of creatures might like each one.

We will be visiting a few more schools before the summer holidays. I will also be running a session with the Digging Deeside group, a community social garden group for vulnerable and isolated adults. It's fantastic to be able to show a wide range of people how fun and accessible citizen science and wildlife recording are.

We will be running some more FREE events in the Wrecsam area throughout the summer. Details are coming soon - keep your eye on this blog or the Xplore social media channels for updates.

Have a great weekend - looking forward to seeing what you all find!

Diolch
Kieran

Posted on June 18, 2021 14:44 by kieran-182 kieran-182 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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The Vermont Lady Beetle BioBlitz was a Success!

Last week over 60 volunteers searched from backyards to mountaintops as part of the weeklong Vermont Lady Beetle BioBlitz to help find and photograph as many of these charming beetles as possible. The event kicked off the summer survey season for the Vermont Lady Beetle Atlas, a project that aims to find and map the distribution of more than 35 species, including 12 native species that have not been seen for decades. During the one-week event, volunteers visited all 14 of Vermont’s counties and reported 138 lady beetle observations representing a dozen different species.

“This was a great way to kick off the lady beetle season,” said Julia Pupko, VCE ECO AmeriCorps member and Vermont Lady Beetle Atlas Project Coordinator. “Whether it was the drought or extremely hot weather at the beginning of the season, I have been having trouble finding beetles this year. Locating over 12 species in one week was awesome!”

Nearly a third of the species reported were introduced, non-native lady beetles, including a species many of us are familiar with when they invade buildings each fall, the Asian Lady Beetle (Harmonia axyridis). Nearly 50% of the observations reported were Asian Lady Beetles, which are likely more prevalent near homes. The decline of native lady beetles may be linked to the introduction of these non-native species.

Volunteers documented 9 native species during the event. The bright red colored Spotted Lady Beetle and the shiny Ursine Spurleg Lady Beetle were the most observed species. The relatively uncommon Bigeminate Sigil Lady Beetle (Hyperaspis bigeminata) was photographed on the ridgelines of Mt. Mansfield and Camel’s Hump, adding 3 more observations to the mere 5 observations of this species previously reported on iNaturalist in Vermont.

“A big thank you to all the participants of the Vermont Lady Beetle BioBlitz,” said Pupko. “We hope many of you will continue to record lady beetles that you find this summer and help us with the Vermont Lady Beetle Atlas.”

You can find out more about the Vermont Lady Beetle Atlas at the Vermont Atlas of Life website - https://val.vtecostudies.org/projects/lady-beetle-atlas/

Posted on June 18, 2021 14:15 by jpupko jpupko | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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The Vermont Lady Beetle BioBlitz was a Success!

Last week over 60 volunteers searched from backyards to mountaintops as part of the weeklong Vermont Lady Beetle BioBlitz to help find and photograph as many of these charming beetles as possible. The event kicked off the summer survey season for the Vermont Lady Beetle Atlas, a project that aims to find and map the distribution of more than 35 species, including 12 native species that have not been seen for decades. During the one-week event, volunteers visited all 14 of Vermont’s counties and reported 138 lady beetle observations representing a dozen different species.

“This was a great way to kick off the lady beetle season,” said Julia Pupko, VCE ECO AmeriCorps member and Vermont Lady Beetle Atlas Project Coordinator. “Whether it was the drought or extremely hot weather at the beginning of the season, I have been having trouble finding beetles this year. Locating over 12 species in one week was awesome!”

Nearly a third of the species reported were introduced, non-native lady beetles, including a species many of us are familiar with when they invade buildings each fall, the Asian Lady Beetle (Harmonia axyridis). Nearly 50% of the observations reported were Asian Lady Beetles, which are likely more prevalent near homes. The decline of native lady beetles may be linked to the introduction of these non-native species.

Volunteers documented 9 native species during the event. The bright red colored Spotted Lady Beetle and the shiny Ursine Spurleg Lady Beetle were the most observed species. The relatively uncommon Bigeminate Sigil Lady Beetle (Hyperaspis bigeminata) was photographed on the ridgelines of Mt. Mansfield and Camel’s Hump, adding 3 more observations to the mere 5 observations of this species previously reported on iNaturalist in Vermont.

“A big thank you to all the participants of the Vermont Lady Beetle BioBlitz,” said Pupko. “We hope many of you will continue to record lady beetles that you find this summer and help us with the Vermont Lady Beetle Atlas.”

You can find out more about the Vermont Lady Beetle Atlas at the Vermont Atlas of Life website - https://val.vtecostudies.org/projects/lady-beetle-atlas/

Posted on June 18, 2021 14:13 by jpupko jpupko | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Coconut Palm

The Coconut Palm was by far the most common tree that I saw around the Island of oahu. It felt that I had to include this important species to my biodiversity project. I took this picture in Waikiki beach. I originally believed that this species was Veitchia Joannis a different member of the Palm (Family Arecaceae). However another member of the iNaturalist community suggested Cocos Nucifera the Coconut Palm. I agreed with the his suggestion.

Posted on June 18, 2021 14:04 by jaylaan_williams jaylaan_williams | 1 observation | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Graceful Twig Ant

The Graceful Twig Ant is the first species that I captured for the biodiversity project and the caterpillars count. I was very excited when I not only got a great image but correctly identified the species on the first try and got research grade. This felt really good and I was very excited that I correctly Identified the ant out of the thousands of ant species in the world. The Graceful Twig Ant ( Pseusomyrmex Gracilis) stems from the ant family (Family Formicade) and the twig and genus (Genus Pseusomyrmex).

Posted on June 18, 2021 13:51 by jaylaan_williams jaylaan_williams | 1 observation | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Gulf Fritillary

While I was on vacation in Hawaii I went on the Makapu’u lighthouse trail hike and I was looking for different types of animals along the way. I was really trying to find something that was unique to the islands because it is the most remote chain of Islands in the world. When I came across this butterfly I immediately took out my phone because I really liked how it looked. I was supper excited with the picture I was able to take because it made Identifying it very easy. The Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis Vanillae) stem from the Brush-footed Butterflies (Family Nymphalidae) and the longwing (tribe Heliconiini).

Posted on June 18, 2021 13:50 by jaylaan_williams jaylaan_williams | 1 observation | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Eastern Chipmunk

There is a lot of biodiversity on the hiking trail that I walk on but the one that I see the most often is the Eastern Chipmunk. While they are very common in my area they are very scared of humans and are very fast they often run away before I could even get me phone out. I finally was able to capture one as it was running back to its hole. Tamias Striatus its scientific name stems from the squirrel family (family Sciuridae) and the ground and African tree squirrel subfamily (Xerinae).

Posted on June 18, 2021 13:49 by jaylaan_williams jaylaan_williams | 1 observation | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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White-Tailed Deer

I was walking around on my hiking trail one morning and I came across a group of white-tailed deer and was excited to get a picture of them for the biodiversity project. I tried to get as close as possible to get a good picture to properly identify them later. As I got closer they scared off and I was unfortunately not able to get a clear picture before they did I was very disappointed because that was a species that I really wanted to include. A few weeks later on the same trail I came across another doe that stood in the middle of a long stretch of the trail and this time I didn’t make the same mistake and zoomed in as far as possible to get a good picture. Odocoileus Virginianus is its scientific name stems from the genus Odocoileus that includes similar species like the Mule deer.

Posted on June 18, 2021 13:49 by jaylaan_williams jaylaan_williams | 1 observation | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Blitz Amiral - édition 2021

La Société d’entomologie du Québec organise une semaine de recensement de l’amiral
blanc (Limenitis arthemis arthemis) du 20 au 26 juin 2021. L’ensemble de la population québécoise est invité à partager leurs observations de ce papillon. Vos observations contribueront à l’acquisition de données qui aideront les scientifiques à mieux connaître l’aire de répartition et les habitats occupés par cette espèce.

Le saviez-vous que l’amiral blanc (Limenitis arthemis arthemis) est en voie de devenir l'insecte emblématique officiel du Québec? Pour plus d'information: https://seq.ca/

Posted on June 18, 2021 13:19 by anieve_bestiole anieve_bestiole | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Welcome to Day 1 of our Bioblitz!

Thank you for joining us! We see some new members to our project and want to give you a wave!

Today is the day! Now begins the first of three days of observing, compiling, and documenting all the critters and living things we see around us. You don’t have to go far to see how beautiful and rich with biodiversity Ottawa is! So get outside and spend some time with Ottawa’s nature.

Let’s try to collect as many observations as we can this weekend! We will be posting total observation counts at the end of each day on our Instagram page!

Did you want to be featured on our Instagram Stories? Share your observations with us via email at biodiversity@ecologyottawa.ca or share them on Instagram using the #EOBioblitz and tagging @ecologyottawa, and you might just be featured!

Need some support on uploading your observations? Look at our earlier posts and you’ll see we have detailed instructions on how to participate.

Happy observing!

Yours naturally,

The Ecology Ottawa Team

Posted on June 18, 2021 13:10 by biodiversity_ecologyottawa biodiversity_ecologyottawa | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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186-NDR Wildes Deutschland ARTE Mediathek

171 is de eerste
NDR Wildes Deutschland

  1. NDR Wildes Deutschland - Die Müritz bis 15.07.2021 ∙ 21:00 Uhr
    Die Müritz ist mit 117 Quadratkilometern der größte See auf deutschem Gebiet, aber bei Weitem nicht der einzige im Nordosten der Bundesrepublik. Allein die Mecklenburgische Seenplatte zwischen Waren und
    Feldberg umfasst etwa 2.000 Seen. Dank des Müritz-Nationalparks ist die Artenvielfalt in diesem Gebiet besonders hoch: Die Hälfte aller deutschen Kraniche brütet in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. Der Fischadler ist der Charaktervogel an der Müritz, der quirlige Fischotter geht hier auf die Jagd, vom Aussterben bedrohte Rotmilane kreisen am Himmel. https://www.ardmediathek.de/video/expeditionen-ins-tierreich/wildes-deutschland-die-mueritz/ndr-fernsehen/Y3JpZDovL25kci5kZS9hM2JkZDdiNy0xZTI4LTQ4NDQtODg1NS02MDI5ZjE3MGZjYzY/
    NDR Wildes Deutschland - Die Müritz bis 15.07.2021 ∙ 21:00 Uhr

  2. Trends van dagvlinders en libellen in het Drentsche Aa-gebied
    De Vlinderstichting heeft onderzoek gedaan naar dagvlinders en libellen in het Drentsche Aa-gebied. De Vlinderstichting kreeg dit verzoek in het kader van een brede analyse van veranderingen in vegetatie en fauna over de afgelopen 40 jaar in dit Natura 2000-gebied. Er is gekeken naar verspreidingsgegevens, verzameld door vrijwilligers van met name de vlinder- en libellenwerkgroepen in Drenthe.

    Vlinders: vooral toename algemene soorten
    Bij de vlinders namen ongeveer evenveel soorten toe als af. Helaas namen vooral de algemenere, stikstoftolerante soorten toe. De achteruitgang van soorten die voorkomen in heide en schraallanden is nog niet gestopt, ondanks herstelmaatregelen. Door de toegenomen verruiging hebben soorten van matig voedselrijke, bloemrijke graslanden niet geprofiteerd. De afname van het oranje zandoogje is daarvoor tekenend.

    Libellen:landelijke trends
    Bij de libellen, die over het geheel mobieler zijn dan vlinders, sluiten de trends sterker aan bij landelijk waargenomen ontwikkelingen. De afname bij libellen deed zich vooral voor bij soorten van vennen en uit koelere klimaatgebieden, zoals de venglazenmaker. De toename betrof met name soorten van stromend water, zoals weidebeekjuffer en de grote keizerlibel die van klimaatopwarming heeft geprofiteerd.
    https://assets.vlinderstichting.nl/docs/e24b4f4a-c5cf-4f7c-9fab-8b5fa71623ea.pdf

  3. 1_Webinar Teunis Piersma
    2_ Webinar Bijen Belgie
    3_Webinar Bijen KNNV
    4_Webinar Turtles PHD Wageningen
    5_Webinar Drentse Aa Otters

  4. Clever as a Magpie From 11/06/2021 to 09/09/2021 Perceptions abound when it comes to magpies; they are seen as clever, mischievous and sometimes aggressive. Many also hold superstitions about these distinctive birds that go back generations. This documentary shows the magpie’s true nature."Clever as a Magpie From 11/06/2021 to 09/09/2021
    https://www.arte.tv/en/videos/083888-000-A/clever-like-a-magpie/
    Clever as a Magpie Available From 11/06/2021 to 09/09/2021

  5. "Cuckoo and Coo" Available From 11/06/2021 to 09/09/2021
    We all know their strategy: The female cuckoo, to save having to bring up her young, places her eggs in other bird species’ nests. Astonishing footage from Europe and Africa of the cuckoo’s ingenious behaviour in the wild. Available From 11/06/2021 to 09/09/2021

    "Cuckoo and Coo" Available From 11/06/2021 to 09/09/2021
    https://www.arte.tv/en/videos/065801-000-A/cuckoo-and-co/
    "Cuckoo and Coo" Available From 11/06/2021 to 09/09/2021

  6. "Planet Earth, Group Decisions in Animal KingDom (1/((2))" Available From 11/06/2021 to to 25/07/2021

    "Planet Earth, Group Decisions in Animal KingDom (1/(2))" Available From 11/06/2021 to to 25/07/2021
    https://www.arte.tv/en/videos/094410-001-A/group-decisions/
    "Planet Earth, Group Decisions" Available From 11/06/2021 to 25/07/2021
    "Planet Earth, Group Decisions in Animal KingDom (1/(2))" Available From 11/06/2021 to 09/09/202

  7. Saving European Amazon Available From 11/06/2021 to 25/11/2021
    A vast wild wetland in Eastern Europe, Polesia is home to rare bird species as well as wolves, bears and European bison. But this haven for wildlife is threatened by the proposed E40 waterway, linking the Baltic with the Black Sea, that would cut straight through the region
    https://www.arte.tv/en/videos/100293-001-A/re-saving-europe-s-amazon/

    Saving European Amazon Available From 11/06/2021 to 25/11/2021
    https://www.arte.tv/en/videos/100293-001-A/re-saving-europe-s-amazon/
    Saving European Amazon Available From 11/06/2021 to 25/11/2021

  8. Muránska Planina - Slovakian National Parks Available From 11/06/2021 to 25/11/2021
    Exploring the national parks of Slovakia, a country at the very heart of Europe. The Muránska Planina is a veritable natural wonder of mountainous forests, home to wild horses, ground squirrels and bears

    Muránska Planina - Slovakian National Parks - Watch the fuExploring the national parks of Slovakia, a country at the very heart of Europe. The Muránska Planina is a veritable natural wonder of mountainous forests, home to wild horses, ground squirrels and bears
    Available From 11/06/2021 to 25/11/2021
    https://www.arte.tv/en/videos/086933-002-A/muranska-planina/
    Muránska Planina - Slovakian National Parks Available From 11/06/2021 to 25/11/2021

  9. 186-NDR Wildes Deutschland ARTE Mediathek
Posted on June 18, 2021 12:41 by ahospers ahospers | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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