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FJ6

Date: 4/17/2021
Time: 2:00 - 3:30 pm
Cloud Cover: 60%
Temperature: 46 degrees F
Wind: 2-7 mph
Precipitation: None
Habitats: Suburban and mixed forest

Posted on April 17, 2021 20:15 by grady_jakobsberg grady_jakobsberg | 14 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Calling all Barred Owls!

Centennial Woods. Forest habitat with pines, maples, oaks, birches and beech trees predominating throughout.
04/17
40 degrees Fahrenheit
9am to 11am
Cloudy. Winds Northwest at 10mph

Posted on April 17, 2021 18:15 by samharesteig samharesteig | 20 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Älä missaa kevään hyönteisiä

Kevät on monille hyönteisille se ainoa hetki, jolloin ne voi helposti havaita. Nyt kannattaa kierrellä kukkivia leskenlehti ja pajukasvustoja. Palkintona on kimalaiskuningattaria, jotka ovat poikkeuksellisen helppoja tunnistaa. Moni muu pistiäinen, perhonen, kovakuoriainen ja nivelkärsäinen suuntaa kevään ensimmäisille mesille.

Posted on April 17, 2021 17:59 by terolinjama terolinjama | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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April 17, 2021 (Bluffers Park Beach)

1 large rabbit
1 killdeer
2 dead raccoons (interestingly, the other day I found two dead raccoons on the other end of the park)
2 gulls I need to identify
7 Dark-eyed Juncos
8 mallards
10 Cardinals (6 males, 4 females; usually a pair of males aggressing each other with a female nearby)
12 Canada Geese
12 Buffleheads
20+ song sparrows
70+ Red-breasted Mergansers (mostly male)
Countless red-winged blackbirds (male and female)

Lots of deer tracks off the main trail.

Posted on April 17, 2021 16:39 by dagda dagda | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Taller de Mariposas Bonaerenses, y Migración de Ascia monuste

Compartimos con ustedes la información de dos eventos próximos de interés.

El día de hoy a las 17hs se transmitirá en vivo el "Taller de Mariposas Bonaerenses: con plantas nativas vuelven las mariposas a tu barrio", organizada por el Proyecto Panambí, en el canal de YouTube Veredas Verdes: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCszJmxRq_1mXQG5OpJu2BIg

Por otra parte, el próximo martes 20 de abril a las 19hs, y como parte del ciclo de charlas “Hoy toca charla SEA – Edición 2021”, de la Sociedad Entomológica Argentina, el Dr. Hernán M. Beccacece brindará la charla "Pasajera en trance: migración de la mariposa blanca Ascia monuste (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) en Argentina". La misma podrá ser vista en vivo en el canal de YouTube de la SEA: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtPN9rPIfyU6smEB9B1L1qQ

Posted on April 17, 2021 16:22 by michelledelaloye michelledelaloye | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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The bees are moving today!

Do not forget to join us for this unique event! The West Plains Beekeepers Association are installing bees in their apiary and will be live streaming the process! Join us on April 17th at 12pm to see the bees move to a new home!

West Plains Beekeeper Assoc.
Time: 12pm Today!!
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82426251886?pwd=M3BBWlNkZ05YYlo2UzRWUkF5Mnlydz09
Meeting ID: 824 2625 1886
Passcode: 983404

If you would like to know a it more about beekeeping or the West Plains Beekeepers Association:
The West Plains Beekeepers Association, based in Medical Lake, WA, is a 501(c)(3) that educates its members and the general public about healthy beekeeping practices. The club trains beekeepers in practical, successful and responsible practices of raising healthy honey bees. The club works to increase the awareness of the importance of honey bees to the environment, the ecology and food production. The club regularly holds classes to help beekeepers obtain Washington State beekeeping certification. www.wpbeekeepers.org

Posted on April 17, 2021 16:16 by alison_johnson alison_johnson | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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The bees are moving today!

Do not forget to join us for this unique event! The West Plains Beekeepers Association are installing bees in their apiary and will be live streaming the process! Join us on April 17th at 12pm to see the bees move to a new home!

West Plains Beekeeper Assoc.
Time: 12pm Today!!
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82426251886?pwd=M3BBWlNkZ05YYlo2UzRWUkF5Mnlydz09
Meeting ID: 824 2625 1886
Passcode: 983404

If you would like to know a it more about beekeeping or the West Plains Beekeepers Association:
The West Plains Beekeepers Association, based in Medical Lake, WA, is a 501(c)(3) that educates its members and the general public about healthy beekeeping practices. The club trains beekeepers in practical, successful and responsible practices of raising healthy honey bees. The club works to increase the awareness of the importance of honey bees to the environment, the ecology and food production. The club regularly holds classes to help beekeepers obtain Washington State beekeeping certification. www.wpbeekeepers.org

Posted on April 17, 2021 16:16 by alison_johnson alison_johnson | 0 comments | Leave a comment
101045 icon thumb

The bees are moving today!

Do not forget to join us for this unique event! The West Plains Beekeepers Association are installing bees in their apiary and will be live streaming the process! Join us on April 17th at 12pm to see the bees move to a new home!

West Plains Beekeeper Assoc.
Time: 12pm Today!!
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82426251886?pwd=M3BBWlNkZ05YYlo2UzRWUkF5Mnlydz09
Meeting ID: 824 2625 1886
Passcode: 983404

If you would like to know a it more about beekeeping or the West Plains Beekeepers Association:
The West Plains Beekeepers Association, based in Medical Lake, WA, is a 501(c)(3) that educates its members and the general public about healthy beekeeping practices. The club trains beekeepers in practical, successful and responsible practices of raising healthy honey bees. The club works to increase the awareness of the importance of honey bees to the environment, the ecology and food production. The club regularly holds classes to help beekeepers obtain Washington State beekeeping certification. www.wpbeekeepers.org

Posted on April 17, 2021 16:15 by alison_johnson alison_johnson | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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The bees are moving today!

Do not forget to join us for this unique event! The West Plains Beekeepers Association are installing bees in their apiary and will be live streaming the process! Join us on April 17th at 12pm to see the bees move to a new home!

West Plains Beekeeper Assoc.
Time: 12pm Today!!
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82426251886?pwd=M3BBWlNkZ05YYlo2UzRWUkF5Mnlydz09
Meeting ID: 824 2625 1886
Passcode: 983404

If you would like to know a it more about beekeeping or the West Plains Beekeepers Association:
The West Plains Beekeepers Association, based in Medical Lake, WA, is a 501(c)(3) that educates its members and the general public about healthy beekeeping practices. The club trains beekeepers in practical, successful and responsible practices of raising healthy honey bees. The club works to increase the awareness of the importance of honey bees to the environment, the ecology and food production. The club regularly holds classes to help beekeepers obtain Washington State beekeeping certification. www.wpbeekeepers.org

Posted on April 17, 2021 16:15 by alison_johnson alison_johnson | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Plants! Plants! Plants!

Curious about the plants you see on your walk or hike? Introducing EWU Dr. Robin O’Quinn who will be fielding questions at the Earth Day BioBlitz Meet-up!
Biography: Robin O’Quinn, PhD, is a Botanist who teaches a range of biology courses from genetics, to sustainability to biological investigation and botany. She is deeply curious about the patterns and processes that shape organismal diversity and her research explores the evolution of plant structures, historical biogeography and aspects of evolutionary ecology.
Video Link: Dr. O’Quinn: https://youtu.be/Wsup-6idcCY

Posted on April 17, 2021 16:13 by alison_johnson alison_johnson | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Plants! Plants! Plants!

Curious about the plants you see on your walk or hike? Introducing EWU Dr. Robin O’Quinn who will be fielding questions at the Earth Day BioBlitz Meet-up!
Biography: Robin O’Quinn, PhD, is a Botanist who teaches a range of biology courses from genetics, to sustainability to biological investigation and botany. She is deeply curious about the patterns and processes that shape organismal diversity and her research explores the evolution of plant structures, historical biogeography and aspects of evolutionary ecology.
Video Link: Dr. O’Quinn: https://youtu.be/Wsup-6idcCY

Posted on April 17, 2021 16:13 by alison_johnson alison_johnson | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Plants! Plants! Plants!

Curious about the plants you see on your walk or hike? Introducing EWU Dr. Robin O’Quinn who will be fielding questions at the Earth Day BioBlitz Meet-up!
Biography: Robin O’Quinn, PhD, is a Botanist who teaches a range of biology courses from genetics, to sustainability to biological investigation and botany. She is deeply curious about the patterns and processes that shape organismal diversity and her research explores the evolution of plant structures, historical biogeography and aspects of evolutionary ecology.
Video Link: Dr. O’Quinn: https://youtu.be/Wsup-6idcCY

Posted on April 17, 2021 16:12 by alison_johnson alison_johnson | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Plants! Plants! Plants!

Curious about the plants you see on your walk or hike? Introducing EWU Dr. Robin O’Quinn who will be fielding questions at the Earth Day BioBlitz Meet-up!
Biography: Robin O’Quinn, PhD, is a Botanist who teaches a range of biology courses from genetics, to sustainability to biological investigation and botany. She is deeply curious about the patterns and processes that shape organismal diversity and her research explores the evolution of plant structures, historical biogeography and aspects of evolutionary ecology.
Video Link: Dr. O’Quinn: https://youtu.be/Wsup-6idcCY

Posted on April 17, 2021 16:12 by alison_johnson alison_johnson | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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2021 Project Page Now Open!

Hello everyone who contributed to the 2020 Inland Empire City Nature Challenge. We will be participating again this year with the hope of having an even better turn out compared to last year's event! If possible, please join our 2021 City Nature Challenge Project Page to receive updates and resources about this year's event: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/city-nature-challenge-2021-inland-empire.

We look forward to seeing your observations. Feel free to message me if you have any questions or concerns. Thanks!

Posted on April 17, 2021 16:10 by breeput breeput | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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12 days, Sanford 14PA10 and Poison Ivy

Sanford 14PA10 is located in the RM of Macdonald. The La Salle River flows from the west to east through the square by the town of Sanford. The square is divided by mile road grids and drainage ditches. Agriculture dominates the land use in this square.

At the time of posting, 23 observations had been uploaded by 6 observers, led by @rjr-mb . 18 species are represented including 5 plants and 5 birds. The survey for the Breeding Bird Atlas of Manitoba confirmed 32 bird species nesting here, with another 37 species probable or possible. Here's the full list.

There are a few species that I feel everyone in Manitoba should be able to identify confidently if they are going outside their own door. For these species, your identification expertise will not only give you higher identification numbers but also make your experience outdoors more pleasant.

Today we are going to brush up on our Poison Ivy identification skills. The species found in Manitoba is Western Poison Ivy (Toxicodendron rydbergii). Some of your reference books may use the name Rhus radicans var rydbergii instead but it is the same plant.

Scoggan's "Flora of Manitoba" informs us that the plant was first collected in Manitoba by Bourgeau in 1857. Eugene Bourgeau was the member of the Palliser Expedition assigned to collect plant specimens for the herbarium at the royal gardens at Kew . Irene M. Spry describes in her book "The Palliser Expedition" their first experience with the plant near Rainy River...

Here they encountered poison ivy for the first time, a plant that, they were surprised to find, produces a most intense itching sensation attended with considerable swelling and rash. These effects lasted for many days; some of the voyageurs suffered severely from them.

While the effect on skin is an excellent fieldmark, I don't want any of you or your companions to suffer so lets make sure to notice it before we get too close.

Scoggan describes the plant's preferred habitat as "woods, thickets, sandhills and clearings in the southern two-fifths of the province". In my experience, it is most frequently found in or at the edges of treed areas where the trees are further apart and there is little or no shrub layer to block the sun completely. The plant needs sun but can tolerate a bit of shade. It cannot grow in very wet conditions. It also does not like very acid soil conditions - so not likely to be found in a peat bog. If the soil is sandy then it is even more likely that you will encounter the plant. The plants preference for drier sunny edges and clearings means that it will be frequently found right at the trail edge.

Finding a single plant is very unusual. Poison ivy generally grows in patches or colonies. Each plant is separated a little from its neighbour, just enough so that the individual plant's leaf canopy gets its own patch of sunlight. It has woody stems but never gets very tall, more ankle height than knees on grown-ups. Wearing something on your legs and feet is generally recommended in areas where the plant is abundant.

"Leaves of three, let it be" is a good start to learning this plant in the summer. Leaves of three leaflets grow from a single stem. Each leaflet has an irregular toothed margin. Usually the number of 'teeth' on one side of the leaflet is not the same as on the other side - and counting those teeth shouldn't strain your brain. Lots and lots of small teeth indicate that you are not looking at a poison ivy plant. In the fall, winter and early spring, the most obvious field mark are the tight clusters of yellowish ridged berries.

There are a few other plants that get confused with this one - the ones that people have asked me most about over the years are Wild Sarsaparilla (Aralia nudicaulis) and the two Parthenocissus - Thicket Creeper and Virginia Creeper. Wild Sarsaparilla does not have a woody stem, its leaves are in groups of 5 finely toothed leaflets, and it has round clusters of dark blue berries with no ridges. The two creepers are woody but they are vines. The creepers also have 5 or more leaflets with many teeth and clusters of very dark colored berries.

Happy Saturday and stay out of the poison ivy!

Posted on April 17, 2021 15:56 by marykrieger marykrieger | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Thank you volunteers!

Big thank you to all our wonderful volunteers who showed up in the rain to help us today! Unfortunately we had to pull it early because we did end up getting the thunderstorm and the lightning was getting very close. Hope to see y’all in September!

Posted on April 17, 2021 15:56 by bug_girl bug_girl | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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City Nature Challenge Frequently Asked Questions

Hi there! After hearing or reading about the City Nature Challenge, you may still have questions you'd like answered or information clarified. Hopefully this FAQ helps you out! If not, please add a comment with any additional questions.

CITY NATURE CHALLENGE FAQ (https://citynaturechallenge.org/cnc-faqs-page/)

City Nature Challenge 2021 important dates:

• Make and share observations: April 30 – May 3
• Get all your observations uploaded and work on identifying: May 4-9
• Results announced: May 10

WHEN CAN I START MAKING OBSERVATIONS THAT WILL COUNT FOR THE CITY NATURE CHALLENGE? WHEN SHOULD I STOP?

All observations made starting on April 30 at 12:00am YOUR LOCAL TIME and up until May 3 at 11:59pm YOUR LOCAL TIME will count for the City Nature Challenge.

CAN I UPLOAD PHOTOS DURING THE CNC THAT I TOOK PRIOR TO THE CNC?

No, only observations made during April 30 – May 3 will count for the City Nature Challenge.

DO I NEED TO JOIN THE PROJECT AND ADD MY OBSERVATIONS TO IT FOR THEM TO BE INCLUDED?

No. All observations that are made within the boundary of the project between April 30 – May 3 will automatically get pulled into the project – YOU DO NOT NEED TO ADD YOUR OBSERVATIONS TO THE PROJECT. You’re welcome to join the project though – that way you’ll get notifications about News posts that are made, and the project will be listed on your observations that get aggregated into it.

HOW CAN I MAKE SURE MY OBSERVATIONS ARE IN MY CITY'S CNC PROJECT?

If your city is using iNaturalist, the easiest way is to go to your city’s project, click the “Observers” tab, and look for your name there! If you’ve joined your city’s project, you can also look at your individual observations and you’ll see your city’s project listed under the “Projects” sidebar.

WHAT KIND OF OBSERVATIONS SHOULD I MAKE DURING THE CNC?

Any observations of WILD plants, animals, fungi, seaweed, bacteria, lichen, etc. you find in and around your city! Observations of living or dead organisms, or evidence of those organisms, like shells, tracks, scat, feathers, etc., are fine. Remember to make sure you’re taking good photos of the organisms!

WHAT IF I MAKE AN OBSERVATION OF SOMETHING I KNOW ISN'T WILD,? WILL IT STILL COUNT FOR THE CNC?

Yes, as long as you’re not making a lot of these observations, most cities will include observations of non-wild organisms during the CNC. However, it’s VERY IMPORTANT TO MARK THOSE OBSERVATIONS AS CAPTIVE/CULTIVATED. Please be a good community member and data steward by marking any observation that you know for sure is not wild as captive/cultivated – in iNaturalist, there’s a field for it in the app when you make an observation. This includes pets, animals in a zoo/aquarium, plants in your garden, potted plants, plants at a botanical garden, etc. Here’s a very short video on how to mark observations as captive/cultivated.

WHAT IF I DON'T KNOW WHAT THE ORGANISM IS THAT I TOOK A PICTURE OF? HOW DO MY OBSERVATIONS GET IDENTIFIED?

No problem! You don’t have to know what species it is you took a photo of – you just need to take a good enough photo (or photos) that it can be identified (see tips for taking good photos). There are a couple ways you can get your observations IDed:

iNaturalist has Computer Vision/Artificial Intelligence (AI) built into it, and when you make an observation with the app or upload an observation on the web, as long as you have connectivity iNaturalist will give you suggestions about what it thinks you just took a photo of, and you can choose one, especially if it says “Visually Similar” AND “Seen Nearby”. Because this functionality is built on observations that other people have already made, in some places (like North America) these suggestions are likely to be correct, and in other places (like Africa and Asia) these suggestions are likely to be wrong. Click here to see tips on when you should or shouldn’t use these suggestions. If none of the AI suggestions seem correct, you can type in your own identification using the search bar, at any level of detail you know (e.g., “California poppy” or “Plants” are both fine to use as an ID!)

Once you upload an observation it can be seen by the entire iNaturalist community, and this is true for many of the other platforms being used by cities. The community can agree with the ID you made, help refine an ID to get it to species level, or correct a mis-identification. Remember though, you need to have taken a good enough photo (or set of photos) that other people can ID the organism you saw! It’s important to remember that all identifications on iNaturalist are made by other users who are all volunteering their time to identify observations; there are no iNaturalist staff members who are paid to add identifications.

DO I HAVE TO MAKE OBSERVATIONS USING THE APP? WHAT IF I WANT TO USE A REAL CAMERA?

For iNaturalist, while it’s convenient to use the app to make observations, it’s fine if you want to use a real camera. You can upload your observations using the Upload tool on iNaturalist, and if your camera doesn’t have a GPS, you can drop a pin to indicate where you made each observation. If you’re planning on making most of your CNC observations using a camera, we recommend watching this short video on how to best use iNaturalist’s Photo Uploader.

WHAT ABOUT IF I SEE SOMETHING BUT DIDN'T GET A PHOTO OF IT - CAN I STILL MAKE AN OBSERVATION?

We get it – sometimes a cool bird or butterfly flies by without stopping and you just can’t get a picture. Yes, you can make observations in iNaturalist and most other platforms without a photo, and most cities will allow observations without photos for the CNC. However, please do this sparingly, and only if you know for sure what the species was, since no one can help ID or confirm an observation without a photo.

CAN I USE SEEK TO MAKE OBSERATIONS?

Seek by iNaturalist is a great way to engage children and families in nature exploration because it does not automatically collect personally identifiable information about users. In order to use Seek to make observations for the City Nature Challenge, you must first login to Seek using your iNaturalist account.

WHERE CAN I SEE HOW MY CITY IS DOING?

Potentially in two places, depending on what platform your city is using to gather observations. The City Nature Challenge website has a list with all the cities, but the numbers are not real-time for some cities. Cities using iNaturalist can see how they’re doing in real-time in the City Nature Challenge umbrella project. Remember that this year the results will be the collaborative effort of everyone around the world – the CNC is no longer a competition.

SOMEONE ADDED AN ID TO MY OBSERATION - SHOULD I AGREE WITH IT? WHAT IF I DON'T AGREE WITH IT?

An identification confirms that you can confidently identify it yourself compared to any possible lookalikes. Please do not simply “Agree” with an ID that someone else has made without confirming that you understand how to identify that taxon. If you agree with the ID without actually knowing the taxon, it may reach Research Grade erroneously.

If you disagree with an identification, the best thing to do is to add an identification of your own. It's helpful to provide a reason for disagreement in a comment. If you think you had the correct identification before the other person added theirs, then it’s useful to write a FRIENDLY comment explaining why you think your ID is correct.

HOW DO OBSERVATIONS IN INATURALIST BECOME RESEARCH GRADE? DO MY OBSERVATIONS HAVE TO GET TO RESEARCH GRADE TO COUNT FOR THE CNC?

To get an observation to “Research Grade” status: (1) it must have a photo, (2) it must have an accurate date and location, (3) it cannot be a captive or cultivated organism, and (4) over 2/3rds of the people adding IDs to it have to agree about what species it is. It’s key to check back on your observations after you make them to see if anyone has added an identification or left a comment, possibly asking you to provide a bit more information about what you saw. Click here to learn more about Research Grade.

All observations will count for the CNC, even those that are not Research Grade.

I TOOK SO MANY PHOTOS DURING THE CNC THAT THERE'S NO WAY I CAN GET THEM ALL UPLOADED BEFORE THE END OF THE DAY ON MAY 3 - WHAT SHOULD I DO?

Relax! Luckily we have a week – up until May 10 at 9am YOUR LOCAL TIME , where you can work on uploading all the observations you made during April 30 – May 3. They’ll still get added to your city’s CNC project, as long as they were made in the April 30 – May 3 window.

CAN I HELP IDENTIFY WHAT PEOPLE FOUND DURING THE CNC? WHAT IF I'M NOT AN EXPERT IN ANYTHING?

Yes! In the same way that anyone can be an observer, anyone can help identify observations. In iNaturalist, go to your city’s project, click “Observations” and you’ll see an “Identify” button pop up just below it. Clicking this will take you to the iNaturalist Identify page and show you all of your city’s observations that still need to be identified. From this page, you can restrict what it shows you by taxon, which helps if you know how to ID certain groups. If you’re not an expert in any group, you can still help by identifying the “unknowns” – the observations with no IDs at all! Click the “Filters” button and then select the dashed-line leaf with a question mark in it:

This will show you all the observations that are currently listed as “unknown.” It’s really helpful to go through these and add high-level IDs like “plants” or “insects” or “birds” or “fungi” – whatever you know about the organism – so people who do know how to ID these groups down to species can find them! Here’s a short video about using the Identify page.

No matter what, please only add an ID of which you can be reasonably sure – it’s fine if you don’t know what something is, and it’s fine to only add a genus or family or even kingdom level ID.

If you want to help identify observations from any city – great and thank you! Click this link to go to the Identify page for the entire City Nature Challenge.

ON INATURALIST, WHY IS THE SPECIES NUMBER DIFFERENT IN MY CITY'S PROJECT VS. IN THE UMBRELLA PROJECT? WHICH ONE WILL COUNT FOR THE RESULTS?

We use the numbers in each city’s project, so you can think of it as branch tips (or “leaves”) – if there are observations identified to a genus but nothing in that genus is IDed to species, then the genus itself will count as a “species.” If there are observations identified to a family but no observations IDed to a genus or species in that family, then the family counts as a “species.” This is how “species” are counted in collection projects.

If you look at the umbrella project for the CNC, the species count for each city is lower, because the umbrella project is only counting actual species.

But for the CNC itself, we will use the “species” number from each city’s project as we compile results from each city.

For the overall collaborative results, we will use the number in the umbrella project.

WHEN ARE THE RESULTS ANNOUNCED?

The results for YOUR CITY will be whatever the numbers are in your project on Monday, May 10 at 9am YOUR LOCAL TIME. It takes almost 24 hours to get the numbers from all the cities, since our cities in New Zealand and our cities in Hawaii are 23 hours apart by time zone. So the very last cities to hit 9am on Monday May 10 are in Hawaii. Results will be announced within 2-3 hours of that time, around 2pm Pacific time.

WHAT ARE THE DATA USED FOR?

On iNaturalist, all the data are freely available to anyone interested in downloading them. iNaturalist observations are used in hundreds of scientific publications. Many of them are using data that is shared with the Global Biodiversity Information Facility as part of the iNaturalist Research-Grade Observations dataset. You can browse the ongoing list of the publications that have cited a GBIF dataset containing at least one record from iNaturalist.

However, we usually find the most immediate use of CNC data happens at a local level: a discovery of a new-to-that-place species, someone documenting a population of a rare or invasive species that wasn't previously known, better understanding of where particular species are in that area, etc. So any local governments, parks departments, or other organizations who track biodiversity/invasive species/rare species in the area that are involved in the City Nature Challenge will likely use the data produced to make more-informed management decisions.

HOW CAN I SHARE ABOUT THE CITY NATURE CHALLENGE ON SOCIAL MEDIA?

Tag any post with #CityNatureChallenge! You can also tweet at us: @citnatchallenge. This year we're also encouraging people to take a #CNCNatureSelfie so we can see you looking for nature in & around your home!

TIPS FOR TAKING PHOTOS DURING THE CITY NATURE CHALLENGE.

The photos you take during the City Nature Challenge are there to provide evidence of the organism you saw, and to help confirm the identification of that organism. Therefore, taking good photos is key to participating in the CNC! Here are some tips to taking photos:

• Focus on one species in each photo: While a meadow full of wildflowers is beautiful, it’s not the best photo for an observation, as there are probably many species represented in that one shot! As much as possible, try to have the one species you’re interested in as the focus of your photo, by getting close and centering your organism in the frame.

• Use the option to have multiple photos in one observation: On iNaturalist and on some of the other platforms, you can have more than one photograph for each observation you make, allowing you to photograph different parts or angles of an organism. For example, one photograph of an entire tree, taken from far away, won’t be very useful in identifying that species of tree, but that “full shot” photo, combined with other photos that show close ups of the leaves, the bark, and any flowers or fruits, will allow that tree to be identified.

• Discard blurry photographs: Be sure to use the option to retake photos when making observations! If the organism moved or there is low light, causing the photograph to be blurry, retake the picture but wait for the organism to be still or turn on your flash. On iNaturalist, the app will show you the photo you took and ask you if you want to retry or if you’re OK with the photo.

• Get close: For small organisms in particular, like ants or aphids, getting a nice close-up shot is important for identification. While it can be difficult to take a good close-up shot using the camera of a smartphone, these days there are inexpensive clip-on macro lenses you can use with your phone to take great, focused pictures of small organisms or close-ups of features of other organisms, like a plant that has tiny flowers or the eyes of a spider.

TIPS FOR USING THE INATURALIST COMPUTER VISION/AI

The Computer Vision/Artificial Intelligence (AI) on iNaturalist is a fun and useful feature that can provide real-time feedback about the observations you’re making. The iNaturalist AI will give you suggestions for ID, but they’re just that—suggestions. Because of this, there are some things to keep in mind to make sure you’re using the AI in the best and most responsible way:

•Check how confident iNaturalist is in the suggestions: The iNaturalist AI will never give you one single suggestion of one species. Instead, based on the photograph you provided and how much information it has about the species in your area, it will offer a list of suggestions, with some information about how confident it is in these suggestions. If it has confidence in the list of suggestions, it will always display a taxonomic level higher than species at the top of the list and say that it is pretty sure your organism is in that group. Then it will list ten species suggestions. If it is not confident in its suggestions, it won’t display a higher taxonomic level and will state that it is not confident enough to make a recommendation. It will still display ten species suggestions, but those suggestions will likely encompass a wide range of organisms that look somewhat similar to your photograph. We recommend only choosing a species suggestion if the iNaturalist AI is “pretty sure” about the ID.

• Look for suggestions that are visually similar and seen nearby: If the iNaturalist AI is “pretty sure,” look through the ten suggested species. Under each species name, it will state why the AI is suggesting it: if it is visually similar, if it has been seen nearby, or if it’s visually similar and has been seen nearby. Suggestions that are listed as visually similar and seen nearby are the best choices!

• Learn more about the suggested species: In the list of suggested species, you can see the name of the species as well as a tiny thumbnail, which can make it difficult to tell if a suggested species seems like the correct ID to your observation. All of those suggestions, though, link to a species information page, where you can see larger photos, read about the species, and see a map of where others have observed it. If it seems like you’ve found a match to your organism, you can even select it as the ID from within the species page.

• Make your own ID: If, after going through all the tips above, you don’t think you’ve found a likely suggestion for your observation, you can always enter your own ID by using the search bar. If you know the species, you can type in a species ID, but you’re also welcome to make an ID at a much higher level, for example “plants” or “birds” or “beetles.” By putting at least some level of identification on your observation, you make it much easier for other iNaturalist members who can help refine that ID to find your observation, rather than leaving it blank.

Posted on April 17, 2021 14:57 by bcfl14 bcfl14 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Goutweed

This organism, or rather patch of the same (or similar) organisms, was found in the North Woods of Central Park. Rocks, larger plants like trees, and mosses were also found in the vicinity of this organism. This plant was growing in a sort of valley-like area, and there was a puddle just a few feet away.

Posted on April 17, 2021 14:49 by sashaaries sashaaries | 1 observation | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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iNaturalist Help / Getting Started / Links

If you are a new iNat user or just want a refresher, here are a few links to pages you might find useful:

Getting Started Guide
Frequently Asked Questions
iNaturalist Forum
iNaturalist Blog

Visit this Link to Identify Observations in this Project.

Feel free message me @naturebugs with any questions about this Project or iNaturalist.

Posted on April 17, 2021 14:37 by naturebugs naturebugs | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Espécies e famílias prioritárias para observação e identificação na Lousã

Tentemos identificar espécies referidas na Lista Vermelha da Flora Vascular em Portugal [1] que possam ocorrer na Lousã. Os grupos ecológios/geográficos mais relevantes (página 66) serão os seguintes, mais ou menos por ordem decrescente de relevância:

  • p.146 Serras do Centro
  • p.157 Bosques e galerias ripícolas (Noroeste e Centro)
  • p.122 Serras do Noroeste
  • p.83 Bosques e galerias ripícolas (Beira interior)
  • p.98 Lameiros e outros prados
  • p.105 Grandes vales mediterrânicos
Eis algumas espécies em perigo observadas nessas regiões, nomeadamente perto da Lousã ou em locais com caraterísticas vagamente semelhantes:
  • Amaryllidaceae > Allium ericetorum
  • Amaryllidaceae > Narcissus cyclamineus
  • Apiaceae > Berula erecta
  • Apiaceae > Eryngium viviparum
  • Apiaceae > Pastinaca sativa
  • Apiaceae > Selinum broteri
  • Asparagaceae > Anthericum liliago
  • Asteraceae > Avellara fistulosa
  • Asteraceae > Doronicum carpetanum
  • Asteraceae > Jurinea humilis
  • Asteraceae > Senecio doria
  • Asteraceae > Senecio nemorensis
  • Blechnaceae > Woodwardia radicans
  • Brassicaceae > Arabis beirana (endemismo raro)
  • Brassicaceae > Erysimum lagascae
  • Caryophyllaceae > Dianthus laricifolius (endemismo)
  • Caryophyllaceae > Lychnis flos-cuculi
  • Culcitaceae > Culcita macrocarpa
  • Cyperaceae > Carex durieui
  • Cyperaceae > Eleocharis acicularis
  • Cyperaceae > Rhynchospora alba
  • Dipsacaceae > Knautia nevadensis
  • Dipsacaceae > Succisa pinnatifida
  • Dipsacaceae > Succisella carvalhoana
  • Dryopteridaceae > Dryopteris carthusiana
  • Dryopteridaceae > Dryopteris guanchica
  • Ericaceae > Monotropa hypopitys
  • Fabaceae > Astragalus glycyphyllos
  • Fabaceae > Genista berberidea
  • Fabaceae > Vicia orobus
  • Hymenophyllaceae > Vandenboschia speciosa
  • Lamiaceae > Nepeta caerulea
  • Lamiaceae > Stachys palustris
  • Liliaceae > Lilium martagon
  • Lycopodiaceae > Lycopodiella inundata
  • Lycopodiaceae > Palhinhaea cernua
  • Menyanthaceae > Menyanthes trifoliata
  • Ophioglossaceae > Ophioglossum vulgatum
  • Orchidaceae > Cephalanthera rubra
  • Orchidaceae > Epipactis fageticola
  • Orchidaceae > Neotinea/Orchis ustulata (endemismo raro)
  • Orchidaceae > Neottia nidus-avis
  • Orchidaceae > Platanthera bifolia (supostamente presente na Lousã apesar de preferir substratos alcalinos)
  • Primulaceae > Lysimachia ephemerum
  • Ranunculaceae > Anemone nemorosa
  • Ranunculaceae > Ranunculus henriquesii (endemismo)
  • Rosaceae > Potentilla montana
  • Rosaceae > Rosa rubiginosa
  • Rosaceae > Rubus genevieri (eventualmente terá sido observada por mim na Lousã)
  • Rosaceae > Sorbus aria
  • Rosaceae > Sorbus latifolia (possivelmente já avistado entre o Freixo e Ceira dos Vales)
  • Rosaceae > Sorbus torminalis
  • Santalaceae > Viscum album
  • Taxaceae > Taxus baccata
  • Thymelaeaceae > Thymelaea broteriana
  • Valerianaceae > Valeriana dioica
  • Valerianaceae > Valeriana montana
  • Valerianaceae > Valeriana officinalis
  • Xanthorrhoeaceae > Asphodelus bento-rainhae (endemismo raro)

[1] https://listavermelha-flora.pt/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Lista_Vermelha_Flora_Vascular_Portugal_Continental_2020_versao_digital.pdf

Posted on April 17, 2021 14:16 by mferreira mferreira | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Welcome to the Portland NPSO Chapter’s May BioBlitz.

Thank you for joining our effort to track the phenology of wildflowers in the Portland Vancouver area. With all of the beautiful flowers that are already out in April it is hard to wait to open the project. Keep watching, we may decide to open it a week early.

Posted on April 17, 2021 13:52 by schallle schallle | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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April 16, 2021, Spring Migration Update

April 10 - Tundra Swans have started coming over and landing at the mouth of the river - big flocks, Male/Female Canvasback at Point, Kildeer by the government/public boat launch on the ice and then saw 3 Kildeers at the weir
April 11 - Bald Eagle snatched a female Common Goldeneye from the side of the river, then went to the top of the beaver hut to devour the bird. Happened around 4:45 pm
April 12 - First American Coot seen, came out when at the beaver hut on the side of the river by where the Bald Eagles perch
Yellowleg landed on the other side, not sure if Lesser or Greater - guessing Greater
April 13 at the Point - 77 swans counted - mixed, Tundra and Trumpeter, lots of ducks - Mallards, Northern Pintails, Common Goldeneyes, Bufflehead, Green-winged Teals, American Widgeons
April 14 at the Point - first Red-necked Grebe spotted
Blue Heron flew over the Old Smith Highway bridge to the weir - first one spotted
April 15 - Old Smith Highway bridge to weir - Canvasbacks and a Red-headed Duck

Posted on April 17, 2021 12:38 by edith-mackenzie edith-mackenzie | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Beach Cleanup Not Cancelled in most places

Hey guys, just a reminder that our beach cleanup is today, and it’s rain or shine. The only reason we cancel is if there would be danger getting here or danger being here, such as thunder. Here at Baffin Bay, the site is still accessible and we have no thunder, just gonna be wet and rainy, so we will be there. Have a great day, stay safe out there!

Posted on April 17, 2021 12:30 by bug_girl bug_girl | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Deadly virus in rabbits threatens to upend some Western ecosystems.

Since March of last year, government labs have confirmed cases across the West, with the epicenter in the Southwest and Southern California.

https://amp.desertsun.com/amp/7207466002

Posted on April 17, 2021 10:27 by biohexx1 biohexx1 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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В преддверии 2021 года

Уважаемые коллеги (@albinapavlowa, @alenka_timofeeva, @anastasia__sokolova, @angelinaguryanova, @anna-sinichkina, @annvesna, @elizavetakuryshova, @esinm, @eugenelsaransk, @fedascheva, @irina_astashkina, @irinaber, @karpova, @konusovadasha, @kristina_kachanova, @mariatyapuhina, @marinakrygina, @maximryzhov, @mirahunter, @nastya_bar2001, @nastyakalinkina, @nastyakochetkova, @obruchnikova99, @olga_ignatyeva_206, @pankova_l, @regina_kadikina, @sergilus, @shvetsova, @sorokina_tanya23, @vadim98, @yaroslav_otryaskin, @zavaryckina_anastasia)!

 

Близится, а местами также началась, вегетация растений в Республике Мордовия. Большинство из Вас активно участвовало в сборе материалов по распространению растений в Мордовии с помощью инструментов iNaturalist. Я очень рассчитываю, что и в этом году вы сможете поучаствовать в этом!

Пожалуйста, выйдите со мной на связь через комментарии к посту, email (hapugin88@yandex.ru), WhatsApp/Viber (+79510574935) или сообщения на платформе iNaturalist, и сообщите, есть ли у Вас желание и возможность поработать в том же направлении в 2021 году? Имеется также несколько видов, поиску которых можно посвятить особенное внимание. Они могут стать новыми видами для региона и стать объектами специальных научных исследований.

В общем, жду ответов!

 

С уважением,

Анатолий Александрович Хапугин (@hapugin88)
Posted on April 17, 2021 06:54 by hapugin88 hapugin88 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Updated list of obligate wetland plants April 2021

Hi to all members of this project, thank you to those of you that joined when this project was first created, we are finally getting active!

You might have noticed a change in the species list, the list has been updated thanks to Dr Erwin Sieben (UKZN) and Hlengiwe Mtshali (SANBI) to represent a current master list of obligate (always found in wetland conditions) wetland plant species for South Africa.
We acknowledge that a small number of species on the current list may be considered to be riverine or riparian, and we may split into multiple lists in the future.

We welcome feedback within this journal on your observations from the field, especially if you have recommendations for additions or subtractions from the list.

Related to this, we are considering requesting additional information tags such as hydroperiod (temporary, seasonal, permanent) and substrate (peat/organic, sand, clay, other) as this will help to confirm or expand understanding of the narrow or wide habitat preferences of our wetland plants.

Thanks so much! Nancy

Posted on April 17, 2021 06:39 by nancy_job nancy_job | 1 comment | Leave a comment
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San Antonio Valley and Mount Hamilton - 4/16/2021

I finally spent a day driving around San Antonio Valley, and it truly was lovely. Probably not the best year for the carpets of flowers I've heard about, and I think it was a on the early side for some interesting plants. But the Oaks were glowing, and the further in I went, the more flowers. Which was interesting, since I expected more in the lower, grassy hillsides outside of Livermore in mid-April, but very few there. Instead, the higher elevations were much more floral, when I expected them to be much further behind. I saw several species in particular on the west side of Mt. Hamilton in bloom already, that were at the same stage in early May last year.

One star of the show was Buckbrush, which really went off this year in Sierra Azul, and is totally going off around Mt Hamilton now, brightly punctuating the chaparral, and intoxicatingly scenting the breeze. Some nice fields of goldfields and smaller areas of poppies in the valleys. But my main interest was checking out some of the burned area, of which there was much, hill after hill both blackened and occasionally greening, including a lot of stump sprouting. As I've seen elsewhere, one of the main plants that seem to be thriving in the burnt understory are Claytonia, and some others were present too, although many still in their infancy. Another treat was seeing more Blazing Stars than I ever have. Maybe they're always there in at least that density, or maybe they got a boost from the fires. Too bad so much of this drive is past fences, through "private property", one of the worst ideas to ever taint human relation to land.

Posted on April 17, 2021 05:04 by newtpatrol newtpatrol | 12 observations | 1 comment | Leave a comment
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Watering

Today each plot was watered (5 minutes each).

The Phacelia that has gone to seed is already starting to decline and fall over.

There are lots of brown leaves in the Achillea 'Sonoma Coast', maybe not enough water?

It's interesting that the filler seeds didn't necessarily stay in the plot where I spread them! I'm finding Lupine bicolor in Plant Mix 1, where I thought had only spread Achillea seeds, and there is no yarrow growing in Plant Mix 2 where I had broadcasted the Lupine.

The bittercress, which was the most prevalent weed in the beginning of the year is now mostly gone. There is still a lot of chickweed.

Posted on April 17, 2021 04:44 by hackerharker hackerharker | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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15k

Hey, we broke 15k observations today. Keep it up you all.

Posted on April 17, 2021 03:22 by chrisleearm chrisleearm | 1 comment | Leave a comment
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FJ6 FIELD OBSERVATION

Date: April 8, 2021
Observation Period: 3:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Location: Saint Michael's College Natural Area, Essex/Colchester, VT
Weather: 68 degrees F, mostly cloudy, Wind: 8 mph, NW
Habitat: Walking Trail through wetlands, forest and fields encompassing Winooski riverfront, pond, and an open space compost area.

I chose Saint Michael's College Natural Area for an outing after learning from ebird of a possible nest site for a Pileated Woodpecker. After patiently observing the snag and area for a while, I saw evidence of a Pileated Woodpecker, but, unfortunately, I did not see a Pileated Woodpecker.

One interesting observation on this visit was three Turkey Vultures perched in a tree at the compost area. Generally, Turkey Vultures are most often seen aloft, foraging over open areas for carrion by sight and smell as far as one mile away. They return to Vermont in late March and early April after wintering in the Southeastern United States. I wondered where they nested in our area. I found a record for a documented nest site for a Black Vulture, but with a cursory check I was not able to find nesting observations for Turkey Vulture. Nest sites may be caves, ledges on cliffs, hollow logs or trees, dense shrubbery, abandoned hawk nests or deserted buildings. Vermont Atlas of Life documented Vermont's first recorded nest containing two eggs found in early June of 1983 in northwestern Franklin County. It is reported that nests are located mostly by accident.

Species List:
1 Eastern Phoebe
1 American Robin
2 Black-capped Chickadee
1 Red-winged Blackbird
1 Canada Goose
2 Common Raven
1 Hairy Woodpecker
1 Downy Woodpecker
2 Song Sparrow
1 White-breasted Nuthatch
1 Red-bellied Woodpecker
1 Northern Cardinal
3 Turkey Vulture
4 crow, sp

http://val.vtecostudies.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/turkey-vulture.pdf
https://bie.vtatlasoflife.org/species/2481930#overview

Posted on April 17, 2021 02:38 by sdz456 sdz456 | 8 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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