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Apart, but still together.

If there is one common feeling out in the IECC community this year, it is the feeling of loss with the cancellation of the annual conference. Posts across social media can attest that there will be a big gap in our lives this year. But that does not mean we cannot still stay connected. There will be a new twist to this year's BIOBLITZ. Instead of posting observations from the desert (that is unless you live in the desert) post all your finds in your home area. Whether it be from a garden at work, a favorite hiking trail, or even your own back yard, get out out and explore.

We may not be able to physically be together, but that doesn't mean we can't still stay connected with a common purpose. Dethroning Tony Palmer as the one that posts the most observations!

So get up, Get out and Explore!

Posted on August 03, 2020 16:24 by jpsincage jpsincage | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Jewelweed: Ohio's Humblest Gem!

Hello and Happy Monday to all our Wonderful Wildflower Enthusiasts of Cuyahoga Valley! This week let’s talk about Jewelweeds (also known as Touch-me-nots)! Jewelweed is a very popular plant among Herbalists, Ethnobotanists, and lovers of medicinal plants alike. For this reason, I would like to preface this feature by reminding us that Cuyahoga Valley National Park is a park for everybody to enjoy. The natural life within it is our responsibility to protect and share with one another. Doing this successfully means that we are not permitted to take natural resources out of the park.

Please know that there are PLENTY of online stores where you can buy Jewelweed seeds. You can find them by Googling “jewelweed seeds for sale”. Just remember to check for scientific names and remember to BUY NATIVE! Ohio’s native Jewelweeds include common jewelweed (Impatiens capensis, also called Spotted Jewelweed) and pale jewelweed (Impatiens pallida). If you are looking to add jewelweed to your home garden, I would get on buying those seeds ASAP because jewelweed seeds do best when they are planted in the early fall.

Now, back to the plants!

Jewelweed is an herbaceous annual that typically reaches a maximum height of 2-5’ tall. When it is well-established, you might even mistake it for a shrub! Here are some notable characteristics to reference next time you think you’ve spotted jewelweed in CVNP:

Stem:

Jewelweed has a hairless (or, glabrous) stem that contains a sap (Note: plant guides describe a sap-containing stem as succulent). This sap, which also runs through jewelweed leaves, is often harvested as an antidote for poison ivy and stinging nettle. Jewelweed stems are thin, often shiny, and can be green to pale reddish green in color.

Left: Jewelweed as shrub-like growth (courtesy Washington State's NWCB). Middle: green-colored Stem (courtesy Steve Baskauf). Right: reddish green stem (courtesy Dawn Dentzer).

Leaves:

Jewelweed leaves are alternately arranged on its stem. Its leaves are egg shaped and coarsely toothed, meaning its edges are serrate and each tooth is rather large (as opposed to a finely toothed leaf). The upper surface of jewelweed leaves is often dull and smooth. Jewelweed leaves, along with other plants of the Impatiens genera, are waterproof. You’ll notice this by the way rain droplets and morning dew forms beads on the leaf’s surface. Additionally, tiny air bubbles are trapped just beneath the leaf’s surface, giving them a silvery sheen that is most noticeable when wet. Some accredit the Jewelweed name to this silvery sheen. Others say it comes from the plant’s seed, which we will talk about next!

Left: leaf shape (Arthur Haines). Right: water beading on waterproof leaves (Marie Read).

Fruit:

The jewelweed fruit is an elongated capsule (about ½-1” long) that resembles a swollen green bean. When it has grown to full size, it will burst at the slightest touch, hence its other common name, touch-me-not. Fresh seeds are green and resemble a plump sunflower seed. Over time, the green seed becomes black in color. However, when the seed’s thin outer layer is gently peeled or scraped away, a beautiful light turquoise seed is revealed, often referred to as the “jewel” of the jewelweed plant. If you choose to examine the seeds in this manner, please remember to leave them in the park!

Left: Seed pods, common jewelweed flowers, burst seed pods, black seeds, blue seeds, and one green seed (Russ Cohen). Right: Seed pods, green seeds, and burst seed pod (courtesy Jim Conrad's Naturalist Newsletter).

Flowers:

Jewelweed flowers hang on stalks attached to the top of plant stems. Its flowers are tubular and shaped like a cornucopia with a spur that produces nectar. This nectar is desired by pollinators, like hummingbirds, bees, and less commonly, butterflies. Common jewelweed (Impatiens capensis) has orange flowers with reddish spots, while pale jewelweed (Impatiens pallida) flowers are mostly yellow and have fewer spots that are orange. The spur on common jewelweed curves beneath the flower so that it is about parallel with the flower. The spur on pale jewelweed is usually curved less so that its spur is roughly perpendicular to the flower.


Left: Common jewelweed flower and spur (courtesy Washington State's NWCB). Middle: Pale jewelweed flower (G.D. Bebeau). Right: Pale jewelweed spur (G. D. Bebeau).

Habitat preference:

Both common and pale jewelweed prefer to grow in shaded areas but will sometimes tolerate partial sun. They prefer wet soils and can be found in wet forests and on the edges of wetlands, swamps, marshes, stream banks, and even in ditches. While common jewelweed is found almost exclusively in wetter soils, pale jewelweed can sometimes thrive in soils that are slightly drier.

Hopefully, you’ll find this feature helpful this week while you’re hunting for jewelweed observations! If you would like to learn more, Kent Karriker with the US Forest Service wrote an excellent article on jewelweed: https://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/plant-of-the-week/impatiens_capensis.shtml

Posted on August 03, 2020 15:58 by mklein1216 mklein1216 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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August Challenge: Find the Top 20!

It's time for our final summer challenge! For the month of August, let's see how many of iNaturalist's Top 20 Observed Species you can find! With one exception, these can all be found across the entire US (no Western Fence Lizards in the east, sorry). Make yourself a checklist and see who you can find!

Top 20 Observed Species on iNaturalist
Mallard, Anas platyrhynchos
Western Honey Bee, Apis mellifera
Monarch, Danaus plexippus
Great Blue Heron, Ardea herodias
American Robin, Turdus migratorius
House Sparrow, Passer domesticus
Canada Goose, Branta canadensis
White-tailed Deer, Odocoileus virginianus
Red-tailed Hawk, Buteo jamaicensis
Great Egret, Ardea alba
Eastern Gray Squirrel, Sciurus carolinensis
Asian Lady Beetle, Harmonia axyridis
Northern Cardinal, Cardinalis cardinalis
House Finch, Haemorhous mexicanus
Common Dandelion, Taraxacum officinale
Common Yarrow, Achillea millefolium
Western Fence Lizard, Sceloporus occidentalis
Mourning Dove, Zenaida macroura
Rock Pigeon, Columba livia
Red-winged Blackbird, Agelaius phoeniceus

Posted on August 03, 2020 15:49 by klodonnell klodonnell | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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8-2-2020 Update

One week left!

Continue to upload cool pictures of nature for a chance to get close with the Galapagos tortoises.

  • Minseo Kim

Posted on August 03, 2020 14:40 by rlaalstj rlaalstj | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Another "A-Hah!" Moment with Petrophila Moths

Since finishing my previous article clarifying Petrophila jaliscalis and P. santafealis (So. Lep. News 41(3):216-225, Sept. 2019), I have been working on a larger review of the identification of all of the North American members of this genus*. Happily, I have discovered some subtle ways of separating several of the most-often conflated species, especially in the “fulicalis-species group”. But I had been continually frustrated with the distributional patterns and wing patterns of the latter group across Texas and Oklahoma. There just seemed to be some unresolvable discord between assigned species names, wing patterns, biogeography, and DNA barcoding. So I let it all go for several months.

I recently began revisiting this entire mess, rereading original literature and pouring over imagery and barcode taxon trees. With the help of Occam’s Razor and a resounding believe in the constraints of biogeographic history and the fallibility of human endeavors, I came to a major realization this morning. A light-bulb went on. The skies parted and the sun shone. I figured it all out. (And if you believe that last statement, I have a bridge in London I’d like to sell you.) It’s a complex story that I will develop in full detail in my next manuscript, but here are the Cliff Notes, as I currently understand the situation:

  1. Contrary to my previous belief and assertions*, Petrophila fulicalis does in fact occur west of the Mississippi River, in Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas—well down into central Texas in fact.
  2. Petrophila heppneri is primarily confined to the Texas Hill Country with one questionable outlier in Colorado County, TX, on the coastal plain.
  3. Petrophila heppneri and P. fulicalis apparently overlap narrowly in central Texas, definitely in Kerr County, perhaps as far west as Terrell County and east to Blanco and Hays Counties (basically only on the Edwards Plateau).
  4. Petrophila hodgesi remains an Ozark ecoregional specialty but it occurs in close proximity to P. fulicalis in northeast Oklahoma and probably southern Missouri.
  5. Petrophila santafealis, heppneri, and probably hodgesi are all sister taxa to P. canadensis and with it represent a separate lineage (clade, if you will) to a fulicalis-confusalis lineage. The santafealis-hodgesi-heppneri group represents a southern offshoot of canadensis stock distributed patchily in limestone-derived watersheds in Florida, the Ozarks, and the Texas Hill Country. There are very scattered records of similar Petrophila moths in North Carolina, Alabama, and possibly Georgia which to some degree bridge the gaps between the other “species” but the distribution of the group is not (and cannot be) expected to be continuous across the larger landscape. All of these southern populations are probably relictual from some previous wetter or cooler Holocene or late Pleistocene era.

Small footnote: The enigmatic barcode BIN BOLD:AAG9560 was part of the impediment to understanding all of this. Two of its 14 members (Mark Dreiling’s OK specimens) had been labeled “Petrophila hodgesi”. A search on BOLD for the latter taxon brings up images of 7 specimens: Mark’s 2 OK specimens and 5 from Washington Co., AR. Here’s the rub: Mark’s 2 specimens are actually fulicalis (both by wing pattern and by barcode analysis) and the 5 Arkansas specimens, which appear to be legitimate hodgesi, don’t have a BIN assigned to them. That leaves hodgesi without a verified, assigned barcode, as of today.

All of this will be set out in detail in my next manuscript. I will NOT be making any substantial moves or changes to identifications on iNaturalist.org or BugGuide.net until I have something resembling a completed manuscript, but there will be a substantial number of re-identifications at the appropriate moment.

I know you are all on the edge of your seats… ;-)

* See also: https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/27047-id-guide-6-notes-on-texas-petrophila-identification

Posted on August 03, 2020 14:28 by gcwarbler gcwarbler | 1 comment | Leave a comment
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Plus de 50 % de l’objectif atteint!

Grâce à toutes les personnes qui ont partagé leurs observations au Québec depuis le 5 juin 2020, plus de 50 % de l’objectif du Défi biodiversité a déjà été atteint en moins d’un mois. 56 000 observations de plus de 5 000 espèces différentes ont été soumises par 3 500 observateurs. De plus, le Défi comporte un volet philanthropique, dans lequel la Fondation Espace pour la vie (fondationespacepourlavie.ca) invite le public à encourager les participants au Défi en faisant un don de 0,01$ pour chaque observation enregistrée, afin de financer des activités à Espace pour la vie qui favoriseront la santé de la communauté.

La moitié des observations sont des insectes, le papillon amiral étant l'espèce d'insecte la plus observée. Le tiers est des plantes, l'asclépiade commune étant la plante la plus observée. Le mammifère le plus observé est le tamia rayé et l'oiseau le plus observé est le canard colvert. Un bel éventail de la nature qui nous entoure.

Nous avons jusqu’au 31 décembre pour atteindre l’objectif de 100 000 observations. Vous pouvez continuer à participer au projet en soumettant des observations de nature et nous vous invitons à relayer le Défi autour de vous. En plus de vous donner l’occasion d’une pause santé pour connecter à la nature, chaque observation contribuera à documenter l’état de la biodiversité de façon à ce que collectivement, nous soyons inspirés à mieux la protéger.

Profitez bien de l’été et de la nature qui vous entoure.

Merci!
L’équipe du Défi biodiversité

Posted on August 03, 2020 13:48 by espacepourlavie espacepourlavie
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Cottony rosette stem galls on Wyoming big sagebrush

Here are photographs of a rosette gall that I'm trying to identify, all growing on Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata subs. wyomingensis at the Crooked River National Grassland in Madras, Oregon. Galls are between 1 and 4 cm in diameter and are composed of dozens of thin, pointed bracts coated with fine white hairs. There are thousands at the location.

I'm assuming they are some sort of Rhopalomyia (Cecidomiidae), but I can't find a good match in iNaturalist, BugGuide, or on any of the hundreds of web pages and books that document the various galls on sagebrush. Similar galls have also been observed by @ddubois2 on Artemisia cana in Montana (https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/45283788#activity_comment_4818259) and by @serpophaga on Artemisia dracunculus in California (https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/8919705, https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/8919707).

It seems improbable that something so striking is not yet described. If anyone has ideas on what it might be, I'd be grateful for any leads.

Posted on August 03, 2020 12:00 by colinpurrington colinpurrington | 8 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Naturalist club Tues, Aug 4

Hi all,
A group of us has started a monthly naturalist club to share our naturalist experiences. It's like a book club, but instead of books we talk about our nature observations, like we did in our Mass Audubon class.
Our next meeting is Tues, Aug 4, at 7pm.
Send me an email or a direct message in iNat to get a link to the zoom - zupan.jane@gmail.com.
Happy observing!
– Jane

Posted on August 03, 2020 10:53 by janezupan janezupan | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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16000 наблюдений!

Дорогие друзья!

Около 11 дней у нас с вами ушло на достижение цифры 16000 наблюдений. Число видов достигло 1118, экспертов 462, наблюдателей 219. Темпы наблюдений немного замедлились, но у нас по-прежнему остаются отличные шансы до конца лета достигуть отметки 20000 наблюдений.

Рады приветствовать 10 новичков в нашем проекте! Спасибо, что присоединились к нашей команде!

Posted on August 03, 2020 09:39 by vladimirov vladimirov | 1 comment | Leave a comment
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Obserwacje roślinności w środku lata.

W dniach 1 oraz 2 sierpnia przeprowadzono terenowe badania gatunków łąki kwietnej na jednej z posesji w Wilkanowie. Rozpoznano 24 gatunki kwiatów polnych. Analizowaną łąkę cechuje wysoki stopień różnorodności w porównaniu do okolicznych łąk zajmujących znacznie większe areały. Okoliczne łąki cechowały się występowaniem kilku-kilkunastu gatunków. Analizowany teren został pozostawiony naturalnym procesom na początku roku 2020.

Posted on August 03, 2020 09:01 by adamwiernasz adamwiernasz | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Invasive Species on Exmoor

here's a how to video for our Exmoor Non Native Invasive Species Project. ENNIS.

And a list of our target species can be found here. https://www.exmoor-nationalpark.gov.uk/Whats-Special/exmoor-non-native-invasive-species-ennis/exmoors-invasives

Posted on August 03, 2020 08:22 by patrickwm patrickwm | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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how to video for inaturalist

here's a how to video fro this project

and a list of our target species can be found here. https://www.exmoor-nationalpark.gov.uk/Whats-Special/exmoor-non-native-invasive-species-ennis/exmoors-invasives

Posted on August 03, 2020 08:20 by patrickwm patrickwm | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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640 000 наблюдений !!! 1 500 подписчиков !!!

Дорогие друзья! Dear all!
С конца июля мы вернулись к традиционным 20-тысячным отсечкам. На нашем счётчике снова круглая отметка - 640 000 наблюдений в проекте "Флора России"! Для очередной двадцатитысячной отметки нашему сообществу потребовалось ровно 7 суток (в прошлый раз на это ушло 6,5 дней). За неделю число наблюдателей флоры России выросло на 287 человек, а число выявленных и подтверждённых видов сократилось на 96 таксонов благодаря начатой чистке данных, к которой может присоединиться любой эксперт. И наконец другое важное событие - 2 августа у нас стало 1500 подписчиков!
Since late July we are back to the traditional 20K cutoffs. We've got another milestone on the counter - 640,000 observations in the "Flora of Russia" project! For the twenty thousandth mark, our community spent 7 days (comparing to 6.5 days spent for previous 20K). During these days, the number of observers of the flora of Russia increased by 287 folks, and the number of identified and confirmed species droped by 96 taxa due to special efforts on data cleaning. Finally, 1,500th member joined our project yesterday!
Однако действительно новые виды для проекта "Флоры России" наши участники продолжали без устали грузить на iNaturalist. Благодаря @kildor мы теперь можем легко посмотреть, что это за виды. За неделю таковых 25:

Paeonia officinalis
Huperzia chinensis
Oxytropis leptophylla
Dicentra eximia
Amaranthus caudatus
Gomphrena globosa
Prenanthes purpurea
Myriophyllum alterniflorum
Draba siliquosa
Veronica petraea
Micranthes laciniata
Phacellanthus tubiflorus
Chrysanthemum oreastrum
Atriplex laevis
Suaeda corniculata
Cota jailensis
Pilosella auriculoides
Petasites rubellus
Lespedeza davurica
Angelica purpurascens
Alopecurus textilis
Pimpinella calycina
Hieracium juranum
Senecio racemosa
Vicia alpestris

За 7 суток 896 человек смогли выйти на улицу, сделать хотя бы одно наблюдение в природе и загрузить его на iNaturalist. В этот раз доля свежих полевых наблюдений снова составила 52% против 48%, поступивших из ранних архивов пользователей или вытащенных экспертами из бэклога.
Over the past 7 days, 896 people have been able to go outside, make at least a single observation in nature and upload it to iNaturalist. This time, the proportion of fresh field observations was once again 52% versus 48% that came from early archives or pulled by the experts from the backlog.
Давайте снова зафиксируем статистику для истории.
640 000 наблюдений наш проект достиг 2 августа 2020 г. между 0:00 и 6:00 MSK.
The project reached 640,000 observations in 2 August 2020 between 0:00 and 6:00 MSK.
Статистика проекта / Project stats:
640 132 наблюдения - 6 826 видов - 3 629 экспертов - 8 879 наблюдателей | 640,132 observations - 6,826 species - 3,629 experts - 8,879 observers
Статистика антипроекта / Anti-project stats:
124 321 наблюдение - 5 021 вид - 1 355 экспертов - 6 525 наблюдателей | 124,321 observations - 5,021 species - 1,355 experts - 6,525 observers
С прошлого замера проект вырос на 18,7 тыс. наблюдений, а антипроект на 5,4 тыс. наблюдений. Такой прогресс в числе неопределенных наблюдений оставляет надежду на то, что и зимой проект будет активно расти благодаря работе экспертов. Во всяком случае, наблюдений в бэклоге меньше не становится.
В связи с большим наплывом новичков как среди НАБЛЮДАТЕЛЕЙ, так и среди ОРГАНИЗАТОРОВ всевозможных студенческих и школьных практик, квестов и соревнований приходится повторить некоторые базовые принципы нашего проекта и iNaturalist целиком. Теперь основные советы лежат в описании нашего портала здесь: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/flora-of-russia?tab=about . Там есть два важных раздела: НОВИЧКАМ и ОРГАНИЗАТОРАМ МЕРОПРИЯТИЙ. Я очень прошу всех, кто ещё не постиг тонкостей iNaturalist, ещё раз прочитать этот раздел. Если будут вопросы - задавайте их в комментариях, участники проекта помогут с ответом. Если кто-то из экспертов сталкивается с потоком откровенно плохих наблюдений кого-либо из новичков, не стесняйтесь кидать ему (а ещё лучше организатору практики по ссылке "Проекты", которая есть в каждом наблюдении) эту ссылку. Это сбережёт наши скромные трудовые ресурсы, а человеку даст возможность быстро освоиться.

Ниже - традиционые таблички.

1. Самые активные участники (число наблюдений) | Top-observers (number of observations)

Место | Rank Пользователь | User Наблюдений | Observations Видов | Species
1 @apseregin 22557 1608
2 @panasenkonn 13464 1058
3 @dni_catipo 12959 901
4 @velibortravoved 12218 684
5 @katerina_kashirina 9804 1152
6 @vladimir_teplouhov 9750 492
7 @taimyr 8884 1196
8 @dryomys 8647 753
9 @melodi_96 8060 867
10 @eduard_garin 6363 812
11 @ledum 6273 1337
12 @max_carabus 6256 538
13 @pavel_golyakov 6218 868
14 @convallaria1128 6041 1452
15 @a-lapin 5768 520
16 @julia_shner 5747 622
17 @sapsan 5196 1148
18 @alzov 4979 699
19 @npz 4809 527
20 @sokolkov2002 4695 700
21 @olga2019kuryakova 4650 515
22 @vadim_prokhorov 4567 919
23 @olegdavydov 4475 394
24 @aleksandrebel 4287 902
25 @smsergey 3765 572
26 @tatyana-omck 3615 405
27 @phlomis_2019 3605 1137
28 @yurii_basov 3527 499
29 @aleks-khimin 3500 623
30 @borisbolshakov 3464 540
31 @hapugin88 3421 553
32 @tatyanazarubo 3403 534
33 @mallaliev 3339 1137
34 @ramazan_murtazaliev 3339 1754
35 @svetlanakutueva 3250 475
36 @divitre 3238 471
37 @kildor 3163 675
38 @maxim_ismaylov 3134 343
39 @vvolkotrub 3108 1320
40 @dinanesterkova 3074 618

2. Самые активные участники (число видов) | Top-observers (number of species)

Место | Rank Пользователь | User Наблюдений | Observations Видов | Species
1 @ramazan_murtazaliev 3339 1754
2 @apseregin 22557 1608
3 @convallaria1128 6041 1452
4 @ledum 6273 1337
5 @vvolkotrub 3108 1320
6 @taimyr 8884 1196
7 @katerina_kashirina 9804 1152
8 @sapsan 5196 1148
9 @mallaliev 3339 1137
10 @phlomis_2019 3605 1137
11 @panasenkonn 13464 1058
12 @lenatara 2466 952
13 @svdudov 1622 936
14 @vadim_prokhorov 4567 919
15 @aleksandrebel 4287 902
16 @dni_catipo 12959 901
17 @pavel_golyakov 6218 868
18 @melodi_96 8060 867
19 @eduard_garin 6363 812
20 @ev_sklyar 2796 779
21 @svetlana-bogdanovich 2072 766
22 @dryomys 8647 753
23 @gen_ok 1421 724
24 @dinasafina 2636 720
25 @ggularijants 1233 700
26 @sokolkov2002 4695 700
27 @alzov 4979 699
28 @mihail13 1181 692
29 @naturalist16000 2412 688
30 @velibortravoved 12218 684
31 @kildor 3163 675
32 @birdchuvashia 2322 636
33 @sesquicentennial 2747 626
34 @aleks-khimin 3500 623
35 @julia_shner 5747 622
36 @dinanesterkova 3074 618
37 @cambala 1487 608
38 @smsergey 3765 572
39 @ocanire 1761 568
40 @vladimirarkhipov 979 568

3. Статистика региональных проектов (наблюдения) | Regional projects' stats (observations)

Место | Rank Проект | Project Наблюдений | Observations
1 Флора Подмосковья | Moscow Oblast Flora 61769
2 Флора Москвы | Flora of Moscow 53655
3 Флора Брянской области | Bryansk Oblast Flora 31388
4 Флора Курской области | Kursk Oblast Flora 24697
5 Флора Тульской области | Tula Oblast Flora 21987
6 Флора Севастополя | Sevastopol Flora 21239
7 Флора Нижегородской области | Nizhny Novgorod Oblast Flora 21062
8 Флора Новосибирской области | Novosibirsk Oblast Flora 20570
9 Флора Алтайского края | Altai Krai Flora 20139
10 Флора Омской области | Omsk Oblast Flora 19106
11 Флора Чувашии | Chuvash Republic Flora 17582
12 Флора Воронежской области | Voronezh Oblast Flora 15960
13 Флора Мордовии | Flora of Mordovia 15774
14 Флора Иркутской области | Irkutsk Oblast Flora 14963
15 Флора Татарстана | Tatarstan Flora 14936
16 Флора Ярославской области | Yaroslavl Oblast Flora 14038
17 Флора Свердловской области | Sverdlovsk Oblast Flora 13927
18 Флора Башкирии | Bashkortostan Flora 13737
19 Флора Крыма | Flora of the Crimea 13234
20 Флора Камчатки | Kamchatka Flora 12545
21 Флора Владимирской области | Vladimir Oblast Flora 11917
22 Флора Костромской области | Kostroma Oblast Flora 10372
23 Флора Красноярского края | Krasnoyarsk Krai Flora 7948
24 Флора Ленинградской области | Leningrad Oblast Flora 7771
25 Флора Самарской области | Samara Oblast Flora 7722
26 Флора Тверской области | Tver Oblast Flora 7646
27 Флора Санкт-Петербурга | St Petersburg Flora 7638
28 Флора Краснодарского края | Krasnodar Krai Flora 7409
29 Флора Дагестана | Dagestan Flora 7101
30 Флора Калужской области | Kaluga Oblast Flora 7008
31 Флора Тюменской области | Tyumen Oblast Flora 6741
32 Флора Приморского края | Primorsky Krai Flora 6596
33 Флора Калининградской области | Kaliningrad Oblast Flora 6570
34 Флора Белгородской области | Belgorod Oblast Flora 5844
35 Флора Челябинской области | Chelyabinsk Oblast Flora 5354
36 Флора Югры | Flora of Khanty-Mansi Autonomous Okrug 5321
37 Флора Томской области | Tomsk Oblast Flora 5187
38 Флора Пермского края | Perm Krai Flora 4690
39 Флора Кировской области | Kirov Oblast Flora 4194
40 Флора Удмуртии | Udmurt Republic Flora 3433
41 Флора Волгоградской области | Volgograd Oblast Flora 3214
42 Флора Республики Алтай | Altai Republic Flora 3186
43 Флора Сахалинской области | Sakhalin Oblast Flora 3097
44 Флора Липецкой области | Lipetsk Oblast Flora 3011
45 Флора Саратовской области | Saratov Oblast Flora 2817
46 Флора Ростовской области | Rostov Oblast Flora 2731
47 Флора Кемеровской области | Kemerovo Oblast Flora 2722
48 Флора Мурманской области | Murmansk Oblast Flora 2719
49 Флора Рязанской области | Ryazan Oblast Flora 2575
50 Флора Амурской области | Amur Oblast Flora 2571
51 Флора Бурятии | Buryat Republic Flora 2560
52 Флора Архангельской области | Arkhangelsk Oblast Flora 2495
53 Флора Карелии | Flora of Karelia 2240
54 Флора Карачаево-Черкесии | Flora of Karachay-Cherkessia 2164
55 Флора Псковской области | Pskov Oblast Flora 2113
56 Флора Ульяновской области | Ulyanovsk Oblast Flora 2093
57 Флора Ивановской области | Ivanovo Oblast Flora 1631
58 Флора Ямало-Ненецкого АО | Flora of Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug 1566
59 Флора Пензенской области | Penza Oblast Flora 1527
60 Флора Новгородской области | Novgorod Oblast Flora 1377
61 Флора Вологодской области | Vologda Oblast Flora 1095
62 Флора Тамбовской области | Tambov Oblast Flora 977
63 Флора Забайкальского края | Zabaykalsky Krai Flora 886
64 Флора Ставрополья | Stavropol Krai Flora 878
65 Флора Хакасии | Flora of Khakassia 866
66 Флора Чукотки | Flora of Chukotka 866
67 Флора Оренбургской области | Orenburg Oblast Flora 859
68 Флора Адыгеи | Flora of Adygea 854
69 Флора Курганской области | Kurgan Oblast Flora 816
70 Флора Марий Эл | Mari El Flora 783
71 Флора Смоленской области | Smolensk Oblast Flora 739
72 Флора Коми | Komi Republic Flora 646
73 Флора Астраханской области | Astrakhan Oblast Flora 429
74 Флора Якутии | Flora of Yakutia 416
75 Флора Кабардино-Балкарии | Flora of Kabardino-Balkaria 391
76 Флора Орловской области | Oryol Oblast Flora 373
77 Флора Хабаровского края | Khabarovsk Krai Flora 369
78 Флора Тувы | Tyva Republic Flora 181
79 Флора Магаданской области | Magadan Oblast Flora 175
80 Флора России - потеряшки | Flora of Russia - lost-and-found 174
81 Флора Чечни | Chechen Republic Flora 157
82 Флора Еврейской АО | Flora of Jewish Autonomous Oblast 108
83 Флора Северной Осетии | Flora of North Ossetia 107
84 Флора Ненецкого АО | Flora of Nenets Autonomous Okrug 78
85 Флора Калмыкии | Flora of Kalmykia 35
86 Флора Ингушетии | Flora of Ingushetia 30

4. Статистика региональных проектов (виды) | Regional projects' stats (species)

Место | Rank Проект | Project Видов | Species
1 Флора Дагестана | Dagestan Flora 1908
2 Флора Крыма | Flora of the Crimea 1576
3 Флора Приморского края | Primorsky Krai Flora 1432
4 Флора Севастополя | Sevastopol Flora 1383
5 Флора Краснодарского края | Krasnodar Krai Flora 1251
6 Флора Алтайского края | Altai Krai Flora 1206
7 Флора Брянской области | Bryansk Oblast Flora 1185
8 Флора Подмосковья | Moscow Oblast Flora 1181
9 Флора Курской области | Kursk Oblast Flora 1169
10 Флора Воронежской области | Voronezh Oblast Flora 1160
11 Флора Москвы | Flora of Moscow 1133
12 Флора Свердловской области | Sverdlovsk Oblast Flora 1085
13 Флора Красноярского края | Krasnoyarsk Krai Flora 1084
14 Флора Иркутской области | Irkutsk Oblast Flora 1083
15 Флора Татарстана | Tatarstan Flora 1026
16 Флора Нижегородской области | Nizhny Novgorod Oblast Flora 1023
17 Флора Башкирии | Bashkortostan Flora 947
18 Флора Новосибирской области | Novosibirsk Oblast Flora 941
19 Флора Тульской области | Tula Oblast Flora 930
20 Флора Камчатки | Kamchatka Flora 886
21 Флора Ярославской области | Yaroslavl Oblast Flora 865
22 Флора Владимирской области | Vladimir Oblast Flora 864
23 Флора Костромской области | Kostroma Oblast Flora 853
24 Флора Мордовии | Flora of Mordovia 847
25 Флора Чувашии | Chuvash Republic Flora 830
26 Флора Ростовской области | Rostov Oblast Flora 795
27 Флора Омской области | Omsk Oblast Flora 792
28 Флора Белгородской области | Belgorod Oblast Flora 771
29 Флора Республики Алтай | Altai Republic Flora 768
30 Флора Бурятии | Buryat Republic Flora 765
31 Флора Тверской области | Tver Oblast Flora 756
32 Флора Амурской области | Amur Oblast Flora 751
33 Флора Сахалинской области | Sakhalin Oblast Flora 751
34 Флора Томской области | Tomsk Oblast Flora 748
35 Флора Самарской области | Samara Oblast Flora 731
36 Флора Волгоградской области | Volgograd Oblast Flora 727
37 Флора Архангельской области | Arkhangelsk Oblast Flora 717
38 Флора Карачаево-Черкесии | Flora of Karachay-Cherkessia 706
39 Флора Ленинградской области | Leningrad Oblast Flora 701
40 Флора Калужской области | Kaluga Oblast Flora 690
41 Флора Калининградской области | Kaliningrad Oblast Flora 675
42 Флора Кемеровской области | Kemerovo Oblast Flora 662
43 Флора Челябинской области | Chelyabinsk Oblast Flora 628
44 Флора Тюменской области | Tyumen Oblast Flora 627
45 Флора Санкт-Петербурга | St Petersburg Flora 610
46 Флора Пермского края | Perm Krai Flora 603
47 Флора Кировской области | Kirov Oblast Flora 593
48 Флора Югры | Flora of Khanty-Mansi Autonomous Okrug 590
49 Флора Саратовской области | Saratov Oblast Flora 579
50 Флора Удмуртии | Udmurt Republic Flora 563
51 Флора Псковской области | Pskov Oblast Flora 561
52 Флора Липецкой области | Lipetsk Oblast Flora 554
53 Флора Рязанской области | Ryazan Oblast Flora 531
54 Флора Пензенской области | Penza Oblast Flora 530
55 Флора Ульяновской области | Ulyanovsk Oblast Flora 492
56 Флора Мурманской области | Murmansk Oblast Flora 442
57 Флора Адыгеи | Flora of Adygea 427
58 Флора Забайкальского края | Zabaykalsky Krai Flora 420
59 Флора Ивановской области | Ivanovo Oblast Flora 420
60 Флора Карелии | Flora of Karelia 415
61 Флора Новгородской области | Novgorod Oblast Flora 412
62 Флора Ставрополья | Stavropol Krai Flora 396
63 Флора Вологодской области | Vologda Oblast Flora 395
64 Флора Марий Эл | Mari El Flora 389
65 Флора Хакасии | Flora of Khakassia 373
66 Флора Оренбургской области | Orenburg Oblast Flora 368
67 Флора Ямало-Ненецкого АО | Flora of Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug 365
68 Флора Курганской области | Kurgan Oblast Flora 333
69 Флора Смоленской области | Smolensk Oblast Flora 329
70 Флора Тамбовской области | Tambov Oblast Flora 298
71 Флора Коми | Komi Republic Flora 280
72 Флора Чукотки | Flora of Chukotka 274
73 Флора Якутии | Flora of Yakutia 266
74 Флора Кабардино-Балкарии | Flora of Kabardino-Balkaria 237
75 Флора Хабаровского края | Khabarovsk Krai Flora 232
76 Флора Орловской области | Oryol Oblast Flora 206
77 Флора Астраханской области | Astrakhan Oblast Flora 184
78 Флора России - потеряшки | Flora of Russia - lost-and-found 158
79 Флора Тувы | Tyva Republic Flora 150
80 Флора Чечни | Chechen Republic Flora 130
81 Флора Северной Осетии | Flora of North Ossetia 98
82 Флора Магаданской области | Magadan Oblast Flora 92
83 Флора Еврейской АО | Flora of Jewish Autonomous Oblast 68
84 Флора Ненецкого АО | Flora of Nenets Autonomous Okrug 55
85 Флора Ингушетии | Flora of Ingushetia 29
86 Флора Калмыкии | Flora of Kalmykia 20

5. Топ-наблюдатели за 7 дней (по числу видов) | 7-days top-observers (species)

Место | Rank Пользователь | User Наблюдений | Observations Видов | Species
Место Наблюдатель Наблюдений Видов
1 @vadim_prokhorov 386 165
2 @anastasiiamerkulova 258 135
3 @fyodorkhomenko 196 132
4 @evelina_ishmukhametova 167 129
5 @dinasafina 145 117
6 @fedor_kondrachuk 174 105
7 @svetlana-bogdanovich 101 97
8 @margosha 108 93
9 @tatyanazarubo 148 88
10 @baryshkov 86 84
11 @naturalist41466 110 84
12 @convallaria1128 93 78
13 @dimhom 86 75
14 @disertinsky 80 72
15 @kiramarch 78 71
16 @darja_anishenko 68 67
17 @maxim_ismaylov 106 67
18 @naturalist10224 91 65
19 @vladimirbakutov 68 63
20 @evgeniy_benikhanov 69 62
21 @gozheva 65 62
22 @lenatara 66 58
23 @velibortravoved 78 58
24 @zviruha 65 58
25 @alenastudentca 59 56
26 @naturalist8307 66 56
27 @nikolaydorofeev 59 53
28 @pavel_golyakov 64 53
29 @plrays 57 53
30 @merlu 56 52
31 @screech_owl 61 52
32 @dashagavrilova 51 51
33 @dryomys 64 51
34 @tatyana_pavlienko 51 51
35 @thanxto_ 61 51
36 @vist 68 50
37 @asistematicka 53 48
38 @daba 63 48
39 @semerikova_tatiana 49 48
40 @yulia_pesenko 48 48

6. Топ-поставщики видов за 7 дней (поле + архив) | 7-days top species uploaders (field & archives)

Место | Rank Пользователь | User Наблюдений | Observations Видов | Species
Место Наблюдатель Наблюдений Видов
1 @apseregin 917 300
2 @svetlana-bogdanovich 214 181
3 @urij777 191 174
4 @vadim_prokhorov 390 166
5 @evelina_ishmukhametova 221 158
6 @fyodorkhomenko 250 158
7 @plrays 222 141
8 @anastasiiamerkulova 258 135
9 @yaroslavmagazov 323 126
10 @alina_kondratieva 203 125
11 @maglove 210 120
12 @dinasafina 145 117
13 @madmanserg 187 114
14 @dinanesterkova 179 113
15 @fedor_kondrachuk 174 105
16 @tatyanazarubo 173 104
17 @aleks-khimin 151 100
18 @margosha 108 93
19 @naturalist41466 119 93
20 @evgeniy_benikhanov 118 88
21 @baryshkov 86 84
22 @convallaria1128 96 81
23 @ivanova37372 102 81
24 @ledum 135 81
25 @alebedev 127 76
26 @dimhom 86 75
27 @disertinsky 80 72
28 @max_carabus 127 72
29 @kiramarch 78 71
30 @merlu 90 71
31 @one_giant_problem 72 68
32 @darja_anishenko 68 67
33 @maxim_ismaylov 106 67
34 @tatyanapopova 126 66
35 @naturalist10224 91 65
36 @gozheva 66 63
37 @vladimirbakutov 68 63
38 @margo_kak 61 61
39 @vist 89 61
40 @wrrite 77 60

7. Самые активные эксперты для загруженных за 7 дней наблюдений (поле + архив) | Top-experts for the last 7 days uploads (field & archives)

Место | Rank Пользователь | User Определений | IDs
Место Эксперт Идентификаций
1 @convallaria1128 4243
2 @aleks-khimin 1710
3 @madmanserg 1015
4 @julia_shner 955
5 @vadim_prokhorov 730
6 @phlomis_2019 726
7 @allaverkhozina 702
8 @wojciech 523
9 @naturalist31744 305
10 @kiramarch 292
11 @dinanesterkova 290
12 @davydovbotany 290
13 @mallaliev 286
14 @borisbolshakov 279
15 @brothernorbert 271
16 @svg52 240
17 @apseregin 238
18 @beerolha 224
19 @hapugin88 207
20 @olga2019kuryakova 157
Приглашаем всех участников iNaturalist подписываться не только на проект МГУ "Флора России", но и на региональные страницы этого портала. В паспорте каждого наблюдения будет, таким образом, отражена как ссылка как на общероссийский проект, так и региональная принадлежность наблюдения.
Для написания данного поста использован конвертер текстовых и табличных данных, который осуществляет разметку текста. Конвертер разработал Константин Романов (@kildor). Если у вас есть свои проекты, то вам эта ссылка, уверен, пригодится!
Posted on August 03, 2020 04:58 by apseregin apseregin | 1 comment | Leave a comment
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First Evening of California Wild Women's Challenge

I took a brief walk around the block in my residential neighborhood looking for insects a little after 9 PM when the challenge officially started. What a disappointing experience! First, I did not find a single moth under any light. Second, there were so many people out walking about that it made me very self conscious. I'm sure people thought I was casing the neighborhood since I had a flashlight and was looking around buildings. Not an ideal situation. One woman definitely gave me the eye when I was crouching down to photograph my one find.... a large family of cockroaches. Not something I was too excited to see. Not only that...they aren't even native cockroaches!

Posted on August 03, 2020 04:54 by naturephotosuze naturephotosuze | 4 comments | Leave a comment
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Frangula californica 🤢

Got sick today eating a few ripe F. californica berries. It's not often that I've seen that many ripe berries on the bushes - usually there are no berries are the berries are unripe. Based on what I read they have been used to make a coffee-like drink so I thought they were not that toxic. In the past I've eaten maybe a couple berries at the most.

But today there were quite a few ripe berries on some specimens along the Old Railroad Grade fire road so I had about a half-dozen. Unfortunately within the next hour I gradually become more nauseous, eventually vomiting.

One thing I will say - it helps to drink water to flush out your stomach - it's much better to vomit up the water with as much of the berries as you can expel, than to leave them inside.

At home now and feeling better but just a little bit tired.

I have now learned not to eat F. californica berries and paid the price. I'm glad my body did what it needed to do and expelled them. 🤢🤮

If there is anyone who is willing to back up my edit of the F. californica Wikipedia page please do. I just updated the Food and Medicine [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frangula_californica#Food_and_medicine] section of the page which previous said:

"The berries and seeds are safe and edible. The seeds inside the berries makehave anbeen excellent,used caffeine-freeto make [[coffee substitute]], superior to [[chicory]] and with overtones of mocha.http://honest-food.net/2014/08/13/california-coffeeberry-edible/. Accessed 15.6.2015.

Although the plant itself looks much like a coffee plant, its berries, which are succulent, do not, but they can be made into jams and jellies."

It looks like the creator of honest-food.net was trying to plug his website via the article.

Posted on August 03, 2020 03:20 by fpacifica fpacifica | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Tiger bee fly / Xenox tigrinus

I first noticed these in Pennsylvania last summer. When in flight they appear to be much more aggressive then they actually are, and this is on purpose. Like the name implies, they are meant to mimic a bee and it even sounds like one when it flies. These flies have a transparent dark coloration on the wings that appears to follow the veins. The spaces in between the color are completely transparent. The body is completely dark with the exception of the white tufts of "fur" located on the thorax. After finding this mating pair a noticed even more of them and I questioned the possible attractants and did a little research.

According to an article from the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, the adult flies mainly eat pollen and are an important pollinator. At the beginning of summer we removed a section of grass and replaced it with wildflower seeds, which have now become 2-3 feet high flowers that I'm sure these insects visit. After the species mates, the female hunts for carpenter bee nests to lay their eggs. The larvae then hatch and consume the carpenter bee eggs. The backyard of our house has a large wooden deck and awning built by the last person who rented the property, a prime nesting target for carpenter bees. We have also noticed an increase in carpenter bees this year, and we can always tell when a new one makes a nest since they never clean up the wood shavings they discard from the hole they create. Now I know to leave these flies to their business to help control the carpenter bee population in my yard.

Posted on August 03, 2020 02:35 by gzaborowski gzaborowski | 1 observation | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Weekly statistics between July 26, 2020 and August 1, 2020

204 observers made 963 observations between Sunday, July 26 to Saturday, August 1. Among the top five observers, @ronwertz observed 138 examples of life in the Anacostia watershed; @hholbrook contributed 76; @gchilds contributed 55; @stephen220 contributed 51; and @jmgconsult contributed 48. Rounding out the top 11, @mstrecker contributed 29; @carrieseltzer contributed 26; @dtread1 contributed 26; @smoore_catcount contributed 16; and @epic2112 and @spry each contributed 15. 105 people contributed one observation, 34 people contributed two observations, and 17 people contributed 3 observations. Insects were the main species observations this week (349 observations), followed by Plants (315 observations) and Birds (Aves) stayed in third place position (102 observations). Mollusca has the fewest observations (1).
A few highlights of observations are provided below, to celebrate the wide variety of life found in the Anacostia watershed. All observations are welcome, every contribution helps document the magnificent diversity of our community. Thank you to everyone who contributed observations this week!

@jhoban Northern Two-lined Salamander
@ronwertz Belted Kingfisher
@stephen220 Double-crested Cormorant
@ronwertz Killdeer
@mattshabitats Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
@hholbrook Great Spangled Fritillary
@jmgconsult Halloween Pennant
@jamiejorgensen2 North American Luna Moth
@yogichi Twice-stabbed Stink Bug
@bridgetlovesnature Lotus

Observations this week, by Taxon:
Actinopterygii 5
Amphibia 11
Animalia 1
Arachnida 13
Aves 102
Fungi 58
Insecta 349
Mammalia 34
Mollusca 1
Plantae 315
Protozoa 3
Reptilia 35
(blank) 36

Posted on August 03, 2020 00:16 by jmgconsult jmgconsult | 1 comment | Leave a comment
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Alpwatch

Ce 2 août, rejoint le projet Alpwatch. Ils ont référencé plus de 16 000 espèces vivant dans les Alpes. Le projet est très orienté Insectes, puisqu'ils forment 45% des observations. Les plantes viennent au second rang avec 34% plus 9% pour les champignons et lichens. Mes photos de végétaux du projet Flore 74 sont donc maintenant versées dans ce projet, ainsi que diverses observations d'insectes ou de mammifères réalisées dans les départements alpins. À suivre.

Posted on August 02, 2020 21:32 by alainc alainc | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Truly International!

Teams from Australia, Bolivia, Canada, Peru, Russia, USA, and Zimbabwe are all taking part in the INTERNATIONAL BIODIVERSITY CHAMPIONSHIP 2020! Follow along on your social media with the tag #biodiversitychamps !

Posted on August 02, 2020 21:24 by sea sea
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Intro to McIlvaine's Fungi of Philadelphia

I have been talking about this project with various friends in the myco community for about 2 years now, and we are finally getting off the ground and doing some field work! Let me first start by thanking everybody who has contributed to this project so far. Lots of people have listened to me describe vague ideas, helped me formulate plans, helped me in research and now are joining me in the field to look for mushrooms.

For this first post, I would like to briefly describe this project in a little more detail than what is in the description of the project. The essence of this project is an ecology study: to begin to formulate an idea about how much the mycological flora of Philadelphia has changed over the past 120+ years.

120 years sounds like a pretty random number, but it does have relevance. In 1900, American mycologist Charles McIlvaine published what is considered the first comprehensive U.S. field guide, aimed at the general public. His book, "One Thousand American Fungi", was written in Philadelphia and encompasses McIlvaine's mycological experience in the Northeastern United States. He had a co-author named Robert Macadam (although Mcilvaine is widely considered to be the main writer) as well as substantial assistance from Charles Horton Peck (the New York State Botanist who described over 2,700 species of fungi). In this book, McIlvaine often includes details as to where he collected his mushrooms, sometimes in fine detail. Approximately 100 of the species are noted to have been collected specifically in Philadelphia, sometimes in a general location such as Angora, and sometimes very specifically such as Bartram's Garden.

These types of location details leaves us with a list of mushrooms that McIlvaine claims were present in the city of Philadelphia in the late 19th century (while the book was published in 1900, much of his collecting seems to have been done in the 1880's and 1890's). I've reviewed his book and pulled out all of the mushrooms with Philadelphia specific location data and have updated the names into modern taxonomic nomenclature. The end result is a list that can thought of as a "Wanted" list for mushroom species in Philadelphia. Some of the species are easy and still well known in Philadelphia (Grifola frondosa, for instance). Others are quite puzzling and have not been collected since McIlvaine and Peck's time, leaving us wondering what they were possibly looking at! These are the real mysteries to solve.

While this project started out as a personal endeavor, I knew from the beginning that it would be much more efficient (not to mention FUN) to involve others in the hunt. I pitched the idea to the Philadelphia Mycology Club, suggesting that it be the club's official "North American Mycoflora Project" (see https://mycoflora.org). The club has enthusiastically embraced it, for which I am most grateful.

The goal of this project is to visit various sites throughout Philadelphia and attempt to find the mushrooms that McIlvaine found at the end of the 19th century. The hypothesis is that many of these mushrooms will no longer exist within the city, due to changes in the tree populations, loss of habitat, changes in soil composition and other environmental factors. But many of these mushrooms will be found, and maybe we will be surprised by what we do uncover. We will compile a list of the mushrooms that are still present in the city, collecting and vouchering when appropriate and feasible. This 21st century list, when compared with the 19th century list, will begin to shed some light on possible changes in Philadelphia's mycoflora.

The club has already had several outings and we have found several mushrooms that fit into our list within a short period of time. After a few trial runs, I am working out kinks and protocols for how to record our data. iNaturalist will be a big part of it, hence this journal post and project. I will be publishing some guidelines in the near future with better protocols on collecting (especially after the North American Mycoflora Project re-boots itself in early August), and the PMC will continue having small, focused mushroom hunts looking for McIlvaine's mushrooms. This journal will serve as a communication tool to project members.

In the meantime, please upload all of your Philadelphia mushroom finds onto iNaturalist. The Philadelphia Mycology Club Project will collect all fungi taxa finds in the city, and I am placing filters on the taxa that are part of this list. As I get notifications of these finds, I will manually add the observations to this project. So anybody that is documenting mushrooms within Philadelphia and uploading them to iNaturalist can be included in this project! If you would like to become more involved and join for focused mushroom hunts, please email me at: smithson122374@gmail.com and I will add you to the foray list. And if you really want to be a real rock star, study the "Wanted" list and go find these mushrooms anywhere in the city!

The full list of "Wanted" mushrooms can be found here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/phillymycoclub/permalink/1201667373518652/

Posted on August 02, 2020 20:36 by mycofreak mycofreak | 1 comment | Leave a comment
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A great trip!

On the road for 18 days, we camped for 2 nights at each of the following provincial parks:
Bonnechere
Driftwood
Kap-Kig-Iwan
Esker Lakes
René Brunelle
MacLeod
Sleeping Giant
Neys (3 mights)
Windy Lake (1 night)

Highlights included a beautiful paddle in the meandering river at Bonnechère (lovely jewel wing dragonflies, flowering aquatics), fabulous hikes and swimming at Driftwood (awesome pic of interrupted fern, beautiful view of the Ottawa River) + visiting the Dumoine Zec and hiking along the Grande Chute on the Québec side, beautiful waterfalls and trail (and berries) at Kap-Kig, lovely paddle and hikes, also a giant marmotte and a brilliant garter snake at Esker Lakes, Mike's drive up to Little Long Rapids from René Brunelle up beyond the 50th parallel, lovely paddle and another drive up (to Aroland) for Michael from MacLeod, superb trails, a fox catching a snowshoe hare, pelicans and a mamma rough grouse at Sleeping Giant, fabulous paddling in Lake Sup. and up the Little Pic River, hikes, incredible swims and sunsets at Neys. Windy Lake was a good place to wind down. :)

Posted on August 02, 2020 20:02 by mireille-d-oldham mireille-d-oldham | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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A 2nd month!

We created this project, and started posting on July 1st 2020. We are in our second month. Michael is in the lead. Will this ever change???
LOL!

Posted on August 02, 2020 19:49 by mireille-d-oldham mireille-d-oldham | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Πάρκο Ροδινιού

Posted on August 02, 2020 19:43 by eleftherioskats eleftherioskats | 72 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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2019 Rougemont

Posted on August 02, 2020 19:30 by eleftherioskats eleftherioskats | 17 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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2017-2018 Κάλαθος

Posted on August 02, 2020 19:21 by eleftherioskats eleftherioskats | 35 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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2020-08-01 -- Hockley Valley

First iNaturalist-focused trip outside the city.

Mosquitoes started to rob me of my ability for rational thought, so later observations become hasty.

Thoughts:

  • Take / keep taking an anti-histamine
  • Try carrying the picaridin-based repellent in an accessible pocket so it can be resprayed whenever necessary.
  • Switch back to a high-DEET repellent if it continues to not work. And/or wear gloves? The hands were the worst.
  • Take more photos of leaves of flowing plants, other contexts on other plants
  • The cell phone macro lens works surprisingly well but focusing is hard. Take 4k videos when it's too much of a stretch to look at the screen, and screen cap them? Or switch to another app that can do MF / bursts.
  • Take more angles on spiders when possible
  • Maybe some catch/release collection equipment for arthropods (clear plastic bottles, I don't know)

Posted on August 02, 2020 19:04 by crustaceansoup crustaceansoup | 199 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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31 July- 2 August

A beautiful Saturday, but rain moved in at 8 on Sunday, so we left. Saturday morning spent at Green Lake photographing dragonflies and damselflies. Also several good pictures at Scattergood Lake. A few fungi appearing, including Russula spp. First N Leopard Frog photographed!

Posted on August 02, 2020 18:29 by knomealone knomealone | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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31 July- 2 August

A beautiful Saturday, but rain moved in at 8 on Sunday, so we left. Saturday morning spent at Green Lake photographing dragonflies and damselflies. Also several good pictures at Scattergood Lake. A few fungi appearing, including Russula spp. First N Leopard Frog photographed!

Posted on August 02, 2020 18:28 by knomealone knomealone | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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California Wild Women

Hey iNat friends,

@bbunny, @kimssight, @naturephotosuze, @andreacala, @scubabruin and I banded together to form California Wild Women, a team competing in the International Biodiversity Championship of 2020, https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/california-wild-women. If you can, please keep an eye on our observations during the competition, 08/03 to 08/06, 2020, and help with IDs and gender annotations. Top identifiers will be honored!!

More on the championship: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/international-biodiversity-championship-2020.

Many thanks for your help!!

Posted on August 02, 2020 18:26 by kimssight kimssight | 4 comments | Leave a comment
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