Journal archives for October 2019

October 05, 2019

A second species of Phlegmariurus

[From https://www.facebook.com/nzferns/]

New Zealand now has a second species of Phlegmariurus: Phlegmariurus billardierei. And it is an endemic - the only species of Lycopodiaceae that is found only in Aotearoa.

The spore-producing cones are the key to distinguishing the two Phlegmariurus species in New Zealand. In Phlegmariurus billardierei, the leaves immediately above the cones are appressed to the stems. In Phlegmariurus varius, the cones grade into spreading leaves.
In (A) is Phlegmariurus billardierei, with the spore-producing leaves of the cones at left, and appressed sterile leaves at right.

In (B) is Phlegmariurus varius, which always has at least some spreading spore-producing leaves (note the white discs - these are the sporangia). This means the cones seems less distinct than they are in P. billardierei.

Both species are widespread in New Zealand, and commonly grow together. Don't rely on overall form or habitat to tell them apart!

The name billardierei dates back to 1841, but it hasn't been in use for 35 years or more. We've newly moved it into Phlegmariurus.

For more details, you should be able to freely download a pdf from this link:
https://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/Q94TKDDGCFMWYK35SAG8/full?target=10.1080/0028825X.2019.1668438
(Email me if that doesn't work, and I'll send you the pdf.)

All of the plants below are Phlegmariurus varius. Even with the segregation of P. billardierei, P. varius continues to live up to its name.
Phlegmariurus varius can be a big, pendulous epiphyte, a gracile epiphyte, or a stout, upright terrestrial plant (especially in alpine areas).

Posted on October 05, 2019 04:19 by leonperrie leonperrie | 6 comments | Leave a comment